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Politics & Government

Updated at 5:11 p.m. ET

President Trump said Monday that he will "strongly consider" providing written testimony to House impeachment investigators. The president's surprise announcement comes a day after top Democrats invited him to defend himself in the face of accusations that he committed bribery by allegedly using foreign policy as a way to help his 2020 reelection bid.

Releasing "The Report"

Nov 18, 2019

Here is a line from a government report released in 2014:

“The interrogations of CIA detainees were brutal and far worse than the CIA represented to policymakers and others.”

How We Talk When We Talk About Abortion

Nov 18, 2019

Access to abortion is changing, and so is the way we talk about it.

Some of those who are favor of reproductive rights have used the phrase “safe, legal and rare” as a key part of their platform for decades.

But now, some advocates say that phrase is too stigmatizing, and that we shouldn’t be afraid to center abortion access.

The View Of Impeachment From Capitol Hill

Nov 18, 2019

Millions of Americans watched the House’s first set of public hearings of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump’s dealings with Ukraine.

But like we say in journalism, there’s no substitute for being there.

Nick Fandos is a congressional correspondent for The New York Times who’s been reporting on the hearings.

Updated at 2:25 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is giving American companies three more months to do business with the Chinese telecom giant Huawei, the Commerce Department said Monday.

Abortion protesters at the Ohio Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

A new bill that would ban abortions in Ohio has been introduced by Statehouse Republicans. A similar total ban bill was introduced last year didn’t pass. So why is this bill being introduced now?

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The situation in Hong Kong is getting worse.

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Yeah, a fiery standoff at one of its major universities culminated with police storming the barricades in the predawn hours.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNFIRE)

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As the Founding Fathers were drafting the U.S. Constitution, they were explicitly trying to avoid a repeat of the situation they had just fought a war to free themselves from — a ruler with unchecked power.

While they wrote a bare minimum about impeachment in the country's essential governing document, other writings from the time provide rich insights about their intentions.

Updated on November 18 at 4:30 p.m. ET

The House impeachment inquiry begins its second week of public hearings with the Intelligence Committee scheduled to hear testimony from nine more witnesses over three days.

Updated Monday at 9:35 a.m. ET

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a stern warning for President Trump on Sunday: Do not try to retaliate against the intelligence community official whose anonymous complaint helped spur the impeachment inquiry.

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