Politics & Government

Facebook has begun labeling content produced by media outlets it says are under state control, enacting a policy the social network first announced in October.

In rare public comments, the former Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Ret. Gen. Martin Dempsey condemned Trump's threat to use military force to suppress nationwide protests as "dangerous" and "very troubling," in an interview with NPR on Thursday.

"The idea that the president would take charge of the situation using the military was troubling to me," Gen. Dempsey said.

Updated at 8:41 p.m. ET

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska said Thursday she isn't sure she can support President Trump's bid for reelection.

"I think right now as we are, as we are all struggling to ... find ways to express the words that need to be expressed appropriately, questions about who I am going to vote for or not going to vote for, I think are distracting to the moment," Murkowski told reporters.

When Russian-speaking troops showed up in Ukraine six years ago, they were dubbed "little green men": armed forces whose green fatigues bore neither insignia nor identification.

A similar genre of unidentified, armed personnel clad in insignia-free uniforms has appeared policing street protests in Washington, D.C., in recent days, and Democratic lawmakers are demanding answers about just who these anonymous enforcers are.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Sadiqa Reynolds is a former judge, head of the Louisville chapter of the Urban League. And when you visit Louisville, she is the person everyone says you've got to talk with.

(APPLAUSE)

SHAPIRO: At this protest over police violence, as college students speak and cheer, she's kind of playing the role of coach.

SADIQA REYNOLDS: They put me in charge of keeping their stuff.

SHAPIRO: She's handing out masks, making sure the teenagers get in front of the news media.

President Trump is signing an executive order that lets federal agencies waive environmental protections. The move aims to expedite infrastructure projects to help the economy recover.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The dam started to break a couple of days ago. The former head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, retired Admiral Mike Mullen, said he could no longer remain silent. Mullen said he was sickened by seeing security personnel, including members of the National Guard, use force and violence to clear a path for the president. Then last night, former Defense Secretary and retired Marine General James Mattis released a statement condemning President Trump and urging Americans to come together without him.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Almost exactly four years after Russian operatives hacked into the email accounts of prominent Democrats ahead of the 2016 election, Google confirmed on Thursday that foreign adversaries are still at it.

Chinese-backed hackers were observed targeting former Vice President Joe Biden's campaign staff, and Iranian-backed hackers were seen targeting President Trump's campaign staff. Both were targeted with phishing attacks, according to Shane Huntley, the head of Google's Threat Analysis Group.

He said there was no sign the attempts were successful.

The James Cancer Hospital at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

This week the Ohio Senate unanimously approved SB 252, which prohibits health care providers from requiring advanced-stage cancer patients try the cheapest medication first. 

Protesters in front of the Ohio Statehouse in honor of George Floyd, on June 2, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the demonstrations that sprung up across the country after the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Dave Davies, in today for Terry Gross. When police used smoke, flash grenades and chemical spray to clear protesters from Lafayette Square near the White House Monday night for a photo op of President Trump holding a Bible in front of a historic church, the action drew heated criticism. But not much of it came from congressional Republicans, who were mostly silent or supportive.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

U.S. Attorney General William Barr on Thursday defended the decision to order that protesters be driven back from a park near the White House this week and said extremist groups were involved in sometimes violent demonstrations in the aftermath of George Floyd's death.

A bowl of stickers for those taking advantage of early voting, Sunday, March 15, 2020, in Steubenville, Ohio.
Gene Puskar / Associated Press

On a party-line vote, an Ohio House committee passed a bill that will make some changes to election law. Backers say it gives more flexibility to election officials should COVID-19 cause changes this November but its opponents have concerns.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The dam started to break a couple of days ago. The former head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, retired Admiral Mike Mullen, said he could no longer remain silent. Mullen said he was sickened by seeing security personnel, including members of the National Guard, use force and violence to clear a path for the president. Then last night, former Defense Secretary and retired Marine General James Mattis released a statement condemning President Trump and urging Americans to come together without him.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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