Health, Science & Environment

The company that runs Ohio's two nuclear power plants is increasing its stock buyback from $500 million to $800 million, less than a year after lawmakers approved a bailout for those power plants. This has critics questioning the company's financial situation.

In 40 years of smoking, Katie Kennedy has tried four times to quit but always went back to cigarettes. Today, she is summoning a new mental image when a craving comes on: rows of COVID-19 patients hooked to ventilators.

Kennedy's dad also smoked. He was on a ventilator before he died, and seeing how invasive the machine was, and watching his discomfort and distress, made Kennedy vow not to die like that.

The increasing use of telehealth appointments during the COVID-19 pandemic has some worried about the loss of the doctor-patient relationship. A new study suggests ways telehealth can actually strengthen that bond and build trust.  

Case Western Reserve University researcher Dr. Kurt Stange contributed to the study, and said the pandemic has presented unique ways for providers to better get to know their patients.

Two F-16s and a KC-135 with the 121st Air Refueling Wing of the Ohio National Guard conduct a flyby near the Wexner Medical Center.
Debbie Holmes / WOSU

The Ohio Air National Guard conducted a flyby Wednesday over several Columbus-area hospitals to honor the work of health care professionals, first responders, military personnel, and other essential workers during the pandemic. 

The campus of Mount Carmel West in Columbus on Jan. 30, 2019.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

A hearing examiner has recommended the Ohio Board of Nursing take disciplinary action against two former Mount Carmel West nurses involved in the case of William Husel.

Teams from the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center distribute care kits to stop COVID-19.
The Ohio State University

This week, Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center plans to hand out thousands of community care kits to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 in vulnerable areas of Franklin County.

Most health experts agree that the need for a vaccine to prevent COVID-19 is clear.

"To return to a semblance of previous normality, the development of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines is an absolute necessity" is how a perspective in Science magazine puts it.

A picture of triplets.
Morgan and Derek Harnly

WOSU's project Letters From Home is sharing stories from isolation—how Ohioans are getting through this pandemic, alone and together. In addition to adding new challenges to our lives, the coronavirus has also complicated old ones.

chimney releasing smoke
JWVein / Pixabay

This episode originally aired on May 6, 2020.

The Trump administration has continued to weaken air pollution regulations despite warnings that long-term exposure to dirty air relates to higher COVID-19 death rates.

Harvard researchers made the first statistical link between the two last month, just before the administration loosened some clean air regulations and failed to tighten others.

Algae floats in the water at the Maumee Bay State Park marina in Lake Erie in Oregon, Ohio, on Sept. 15, 2017.
Paul Sancya / AP

The latest round of state budget cuts to offset the economic impact of COVID-19 has caused many departments to reevaluate their programs. This includes the H2Ohio fund, which sets money aside to keep Lake Erie, and other water sources, clean.

African American healthcare activist Yvonka Hall poses for a portrait in her Lee-Harvard neighborhood of Cleveland, OH.
Marvin Fong / Eye On Ohio

After moving to allow testing of asymptomatic people from ethnic minority groups disproportionately affected by COVID-19, the CDC this week removed all mentions of race and ethnicity from its testing guidelines.

As hospitals were overrun by coronavirus patients in other parts of the world, the Army Corps of Engineers mobilized in the U.S., hiring private contractors to build emergency field hospitals around the country.

The endeavor cost more than $660 million, according to an NPR analysis of federal spending records.

But nearly four months into the pandemic, most of these facilities haven't treated a single patient.

chimney releasing smoke
JWVein / Pixabay

The Trump administration has continued to weaken air pollution regulations despite warnings that long-term exposure to dirty air relates to higher COVID-19 death rates.

Harvard researchers made the first statistical link between the two last month, just before the administration loosened some clean air regulations and failed to tighten others.

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