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Ohio State researchers have found that exposure to farm animals could help babies improve their immune system.

The Ohio House has voted in favor of the sweeping energy bill, HB6, that bails out two nuclear power plants through $150 million in ratepayer subsidies.

Tech Tuesday: Life360 App And Location Tracking

Jul 23, 2019
Pexels

Mobile devices such as smartphones and wearables are ubiquitous. But the connectivity is about more than touching base. 

For the parents of today’s teens, mobile devices are like digital tethers. For example, the location-sharing app Life360 enables parents to track their children in real-time. Eighteen million monthly users were enrolled last year.

Coming up on Tech Tuesday, tracking your teen and more. 

Ohio Raises Smoking Age To 21

Jul 19, 2019
Cigarette
Google / Creative Commons

Ohio has increased the legal age to buy cigarettes and other tobacco products from 18 to 21.

The main entrance to Mount Carmel West Hospital is shown Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019.
Andrew Welsh-Huggins / Associated Press

Mount Carmel Health System announced Michael Englehart will take over as interim CEO on July 25.

FirstEnergy Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / AP

The sweeping energy bill aimed at saving nuclear plants from shutting down while making big cuts to renewable and efficiency policies was put on hold Wednesday, due to four lawmakers who were not present at the Ohio Statehouse.

Fat Babes Of Columbus founders, from left: Jeannette Burchfield, Hannah Godown, Elizabeth Chinn and Krystal Orr.
Courtesy of Chelsea Tanksley

On a recent Tuesday at Bake Me Happy, four women order lattes and scones before settling into zigzag-patterned bean bags and couches.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

Environmental advocates say the Senate’s new energy plan is taking Ohio in the wrong direction when it comes to emerging energy sources and innovations. That plan would likely bail out two nuclear power plants through new charges on electric bills.

Wellness Wednesday: Measles in Ohio, Burnout

Jul 17, 2019
Nicholas Richter gets a measles vaccine shot from a nurse at a Louisville clinic.
Lisa Gillespie / Side Effects Public Media

A Stark County adult who recently traveled to a state with confirmed measles cases is the first Ohioan to contract the disease this year.

Ohio hasn’t seen an outbreak since 2014, when 382 cases were confirmed. 

Today on Wellness Wednesday, what might be ahead for Ohio in the latest measles outbreak, and more.

One of Ashtabula's 19 covered bridges crosses the river just south of town. A total of 46 miles of the river and its tributaries were named scenic rivers in 2008.
Jeff St. Clair / WKSU

Patricia Seymour grew up in Ashtabula in the 1960ss. On bright spring day at the city’s bustling harbor, Seymour recalls a childhood landscape more reminiscent of the Lord of the Rings.

“It was like Mordor,” Seymour says.

Starr Roden, left, a registered nurse and immunization outreach coordinator with the Knox County Health Department, administers a vaccination to Jonathan Detweiler, 6, at the facility in Mount Vernon, Ohio.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Franklin County Public Health is offering the Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine, without appointments, at locations across the county Wednesday-Friday.

A new version of the comprehensive energy bill, HB6, was introduced in the Ohio Senate on Monday that would charge residential ratepayers $0.85 a month on their electric bills to bail out the state's two nuclear power plants.

Federal Hocking Superintendent George Wood and former Gov. Ted Strickland look at an image of the middle and high school's roof with the solar arrays.
Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

Federal Hocking Local Schools flipped the switch on its new solar energy installation that will provide about 700 kilowatts of renewable energy, making up about 70% of the school building’s energy use.

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