Health, Science & Environment | WOSU Radio

Health, Science & Environment

Private insurance companies in Ohio are now required to cover doctor visits over the phone or on the computer.

The recently approved state budget includes a provision requiring insurance companies to cover remote doctor visits called telemedicine.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R) signed the two-year budget bill July 18. Authorization of telehelath coverage is just one of the many state programs the sweeping $69 billion document covers.

Ohio House

The Ohio House Speaker said opponents of the state’s new energy law will need big money to overturn it.

In Florida, the Army Corps of Engineers is working to combat a growing environmental menace: blue-green algae. Nitrogen and phosphorus runoff from farms and subdivisions combines with warm summer weather to create massive blooms of algae in rivers and lakes that can be toxic.

A University of Cincinnati space professor who studies everything from Mars to maps is taking a deeper look into why so many people are coming to the U.S. Twenty-five years of satellite maps show deforestation and subsequent climate change are driving migrants to leave Central America.

Viktoriia Radchuk, an evolutionary ecologist at Berlin's Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, wanted to know how animals were responding to climate change.

So she scoured the results of more than 10,000 animal studies — on species from frogs to snakes, from insects to birds to mammals — looking for information on how changing environments were affecting animal behavior. Based on the available data, she decided to focus on birds in the Northern Hemisphere.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts is leading the charge for a possible ballot referendum to stop the new energy law that would bail out the state's two nuclear plants through $150 million in ratepayer subsidies a year.

A selection of produce at the Veggie Van in Linden. The project launched this summer, bringing fresh fruit and vegetables to Columbus' food deserts.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Monique Williams McCoy greets everyone walking down Cleveland Avenue like a neighbor.

"Hey y’all!" she calls out. "You coming over to check it out today, right? Over to the mobile market?"

The Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station on Lake Erie is scheduled to shut down in 2020.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, host Mike Thompson discusses the new state law that bails out two nuclear power plants and scraps renewable energy mandates. Statehouse News Bureau reporter Andy Chow joins the show.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

The passage of HB 6 this week not only gave Ohio’s two FirstEnergy Solutions nuclear plants a $150 million subsidy to remain open, it also keeps the communities and school districts relying on those plants' taxes from taking an additional financial hit.

Graduate student Shahab Haghayegh has long had trouble sleeping. But when the biomedical engineering student began his doctoral program at the University of Texas at Austin five years ago, his issues worsened. "I would go to bed at 3 or 4 a.m. and wake up at 8 a.m.," he says. The exhausted Haghayegh was getting an average of just 4 or 5 hours sleep a night.

Cleveland City Council passed new lead paint requirements for landlords Wednesday, giving Mayor Frank Jackson’s administration 18 months to develop a citywide program to reduce childhood lead poisoning.

The law requires owners of rentals built before 1978 to have their properties inspected for lead hazards every two years. Cleveland’s Building and Housing Department will start enforcing the new rules in March 2021 and require all rentals to be certified as lead safe by 2023. The legislation also doubles the rental registration fee, raising it from $35 to $70.

Rep. Marcy Kaptur speaks in Washington, D.C. on July 18, 2018, on the anniversary of the Seneca Falls convention.
Marcy Kaptur / Twitter

Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio), who chairs a U.S. House energy and water subcommittee, says that Ohio’s new energy bill is a step in the wrong direction.

The Senate has voted 97-2 to approve a bill that will virtually ensure permanent funding for rescue workers whose work after the Sept. 11 attacks caused health problems.

The House passed the bill last month, and President Trump is expected to approve it, ending a years-long ordeal for the victims after concerns that the fund was on the verge of running out of money.

Pages