Health, Science & Environment | WOSU Radio

Health, Science & Environment

Opponents of abortion pill reversal bill gather in front of the  Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Two Democratic lawmakers are fighting back on bills now under consideration that would require doctors to provide patients with information mainstream medical groups consider inaccurate and not scientifically sound.

Wind turbines in Blue Creek Township in Paulding County, Ohio.
Nyttend / Wikimedia Commons

Republican lawmakers in the Ohio House and Senate are pushing for a bill that would allow township voters to reject wind farm projects through a referendum.

Amazon Prime delivery trucks.
Todd Van Hoosear / Flickr

The city of Columbus announced a new program this week to help manage traffic flow around deliveries. It’s working with mobility company curbFlow to coordinate pickup and drop-off activity.

The man most closely linked to President Trump's push to make coal great again — and the head of the country's largest privately owned coal mining company — is now the latest to reckon with the industry's decline.

Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET

In a blow to the Trump administration, a federal court in Manhattan has knocked down a rule that would make it easier for doctors and other health care workers to refuse care for religious reasons.

On Thursday, Indiana temporarily suspended its Medicaid work requirement program known as Gateway to Work. Like several other states, it faced a court challenge to rules that could have eliminated health insurance for many low-income Hoosiers. 

Updated at 6:30 p.m.

The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed relaxing two Obama-era regulations on waste products from coal-fired power plants, a move environmental groups say would prolong the risk of toxic spills or drinking water contamination.

Maureen Corcoran is sworn in as Ohio Medicaid director by Gov. Mike DeWine in January.
Ohio Medicaid / Twitter

Ohio residents who will face work requirements to continue receiving Medicaid health care coverage won't lose their benefits until after they have spoken to a caseworker, according to a proposed state plan.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren says paying for "Medicare for All" would require $20.5 trillion in new federal spending over a decade. That spending includes higher taxes on the wealthy but no new taxes on the middle class.

The Democratic presidential candidate released her plan to pay for Medicare for All on Friday after being dogged for months by questions of how she would finance such a sweeping overhaul of the health care system. That pressure has been intensified by the fact that Warren has made detailed proposals a central part of her brand as a candidate.

Google broke ground on a new $600 million data center in New Albany, a central Ohio suburb. The data center is expected to generate about 50 jobs within the next few years.

A Russian law has taken effect that, in theory, would allow the Russian government to cut off the country's Internet from the rest of the world.

The "sovereign Internet law," as the government calls it, greatly enhances the Kremlin's control over the Web. It was passed earlier this year and allows Russia's government to cut off the Internet completely or from traffic outside Russia "in an emergency," as the BBC reported. But some of the applications could be more subtle, like the ability to block a single post.

Rep. Adam Holmes (R-Nashport, center) talks about his bill that provides options for suprise medical bills along with Reps. Jim Butler (R-Oakwood. left), Jay Edwards (R-Nelsonville) and Sara Carruthers (R-Hamilton).
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Several Ohio House Republicans are backing a bill that they say provides options to avoid "surprise billing," when patients get unexpected big invoices from out of network providers after visiting an in-network hospital or health care facility.

Judith Garcia, 19, fills a syringe as she prepares to give herself an injection of insulin at her home in the Los Angeles suburb of Commerce, Calif.
Reed Saxon / AP

Diabetics who depend on insulin to live often find themselves paying hundreds, sometimes more than $1,000 a month, for that medication. A new bill would limit that out of pocket cost to $100 for a one month supply.

doctor
Pixabay

There are about 133,000 children in Ohio that do not have health insurance, according to a report from the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families.

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