Education

Photo of Ohio State's Oval
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU Public Media

WOSU's Letters from Home collects stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we heard from Ohioans sharing their feelings about the impending school year, and the state's plans on how to safely reopen classes.

Avery Elementary School in Hilliard on May 11, 2020.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

Ohio teachers and union leaders called on the U.S. Senate to pass a COVID-19 relief bill immediately on Monday afternoon.

An educator prepare to enter the shoot house, which is meant to simulate a hallway, doors and corners of a school.
Annie Wu / ideastream

A bill that would give Ohio’s local school boards the power to allow employees to carry guns in school buildings gets its first Senate hearing in almost two months on Tuesday. However, gun control groups say the bill also eliminates required weapons training for those workers.

Central State University is launching a technology education program and will serve as a regional hub for historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) across the Midwest.

Evening building supervisor Randy Allen sweeps the hallways at Orange High School, Thursday, March 12, 2020, in Pepper Pike.
Tony Dejak / AP

Gov. Mike DeWine says he’s telling schools to prepare for anything, including the possibility of not opening their doors at all next month.

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on Friday released his plan for how schools should safely reopen amid the ongoing coronavirus crisis, calling on Congress to pass a $30 billion emergency education package to support building upgrades and sanitation protocols ahead of students' return to onsite learning.

"The challenge facing our schools is unprecedented. President Trump has made it much worse. We had a window to get this right. And, Trump blew it," the Biden campaign said in a statement.

The NCAA released new guidelines on Thursday for colleges and universities looking to resume sports in the fall. The big message: The outlook is getting worse, not better.

For the second time in two months, the Trump administration has sided with the for-profit college industry over a key constituency: veterans. In May, the president vetoed a bipartisan bill promoting debt forgiveness for veterans who were defrauded by for-profit schools. Now, the Department of Veterans Affairs is allowing two repeat-offending schools access to GI Bill money.

Clinton Elementary school was closed when the Coronavirus hit. Now with schools slated to reopen in the fall, Ohioans wrote in with their thoughts.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU Public Media

WOSU's Letters from Home collects stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we heard from Ohioans sharing their feelings about the impending school year, and the state's plans on how to safely reopen classes.

Updated at 6:34 p.m. ET

In a swift reversal, the Trump administration has agreed to rescind a directive that would have barred international college students from the U.S. if their colleges offered classes entirely online in the fall semester.

Kindergarten teacher Mindy Skinner reads to one of her kindergarten classes.
Debbie Holmes / WOSU

Columbus City Schools released its plan for fall two weeks ago, and now a number of outlying districts have shared their ideas for returning. Students across the area can expect to wear masks, and in most cases, will only be in the classroom for part of the week.

The Ohio Controlling Board on Monday approved requests to appropriate additional CARES Act funding for schools and universities.

The state Office of Budget and Management received approval for additional funds of roughly $200 million for higher education and $100 million for K-12 schools. The funds would be meant to cover increased education costs brought on by the coronavirus pandemic.

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