Business & Economy

President Trump, touting May's lower-than-expected unemployment rate Friday, said a strong economy was the "greatest thing that could happen for race relations."

And he seemed to proclaim that George Floyd, whose killing by police in Minneapolis has sparked more than a week of protests, would be happy with the economic news.

Updated at 4:13 p.m. ET

The U.S economy rebounded with surprising strength last month as businesses began to reopen from the coronavirus lockdown. U.S. employers added 2.5 million jobs in May, and the unemployment rate fell to 13.3%.

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Some Over-the-Rhine businesses are open and others remain closed as the coronavirus pandemic and protests over the police killing of George Floyd continue.

A group of artists were paid to paint temporary murals over the boarded-up windows of the Ohio Theatre on June 2, 2020, after it was damaged during protests.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

The Central Ohio African-American Chamber of Commerce is helping several black-owned businesses pick up the pieces after being damaged during recent protests.

Across the state of Ohio, local music venues are struggling as the coronavirus pandemic has forced these entertainment hotspots to keep operations at a standstill. Local musicians who rely on live performances to earn a steady income have suffered with planned concerts canceled or postponed indefinitely.

Willie Ramey cleans up from a night of protests on Gay Street in downtown Columbus on June 1, 2020.
Nick Evans / WOSU

As the sun crept over downtown Columbus on Monday morning, residents and workers again found themselves cleaning up after a day of protests.

Chad Goodwin at the door to his restaurant 4th & State on May 29, 2020.
Nick Evans / WOSU

At 4th & State downtown, a team of workers are punching broken panes of glass out of their window frames. 

A man cleans the sidewalk in front of the Grandview Theater on May 14, 2020.
David Holm / WOSU

Columbus will use $5.5 million of its federal CARES Act funding for grants and loans to local small businesses.

Rebecca Roth reviews applications for election ballots at the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections, Wednesday, April 22, 2020, in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss President Trump's inaccurate claim that mail-in ballots are ripe for fraud. Michael McDonald, a political science professor at the University of Florida, joins the show.

Tens of millions of people are out of work because of the coronavirus pandemic, but Amazon says it's willing to keep 125,000 people it hired to deal with the online shopping spike as permanent workers.

The company hired 175,000 temporary workers as people stuck at home because of the pandemic switched to shopping online. Now Amazon says it's offering most of those workers permanent full-time jobs.

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