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Business & Economy

Updated at 12:08 p.m. ET

In a case with consequences for fans of wine and liquor, the U.S. Supreme Court, in a 7-2 decision, has struck down a two-year residency requirement for anyone seeking an initial license to operate a liquor store in Tennessee.

There is no doubt that if a state had such a restrictive provision involving the sale of any other product, it would be deemed a violation of the Constitution's ban on erecting barriers to interstate commerce.

Future Of Retail

Jun 26, 2019
Nicholas Eckhart / Flick Creative Commons

Big department stores such as Macy's and Sears were once retail empires. 

 

Now mass closures and layoffs have some business analysts predicting the end of physical retail stores. Other experts disagree, saying that those in retail can stay viable by shedding the dead weight of low-profit stores and focusing on innovation. 

 

Today on All Sides, the future of retail and where Columbus stands. 

Financial Literacy In African American Communities

Jun 24, 2019
Saving money in a piggy bank
Flickr Creative Commons

Jay-Z recently became the first billionaire rapper. 

Sure, his music is profitable. But his investments were more so, and he’s just getting started. In his song, “The Story of OJ,” Jay-Z talks about financial literacy to show African American youth how it works.

For many African Americans, financial illiteracy is a function of several factors, all of which revolve around the lack of wealth, including institutionalized racism and perennial low wages. 

Today on All Sides, a look at the history of wealth and financial literacy in African American communities and what’s being done to change the trajectory.  

Visitors in the Short North will soon be able to pay for parking with an app.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus officials are making changes to parking rules in the Short North just a few months after implementing them. The revisions are a result of feedback from residents and business owners.

Workers build Honda Accords at the Honda factory in Marysville,ohio
Steve Brown / WOSU

Ohio’s official unemployment rate fell to an 18-year low in May 2019, according to the latest jobs data released by labor officials Friday.

Gov. Mike DeWine talks to farmer Kris Swartz in Perrysburg on June 19, 2019.
Nick Evans / WOSU

In Perrysburg on Wednesday, Kris Swartz hosted Gov. Mike DeWine and a couple dozen local famers to explain how badly this spring’s rain has derailed planting. Swartz says this year he’s had only one day—June 12—where he was able to plant.

Updated at 11:04 a.m. ET

For Douglas Clark, the darkest part of working for Nike in the 1980s was watching American shoe manufacturing "evaporate" in the Northeast in a mass exodus to Asia in pursuit of cheaper labor.

"As a true Yankee — and my father was a Colonial historian — you know, it was heartbreaking," he said.

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, speaks at a Culinary Union hall Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019, in Las Vegas.
John Locher / Associated Press

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) is proposing a bill that would require overtime pay for any salaried worker making less than $51,064, a more than $15,000 increase to the Trump Administration's proposed threshold.

Record rainfall in Cincinnati is causing a local co-operative farm to re-adjust its harvest plan.

WOSU

A coalition of groups that advocates for low-income Ohioans says the state has made considerable progress in the effort to reduce poverty, but there is much more work to be done.

A group of more than 600 companies and trade associations have signed a letter to the president asking him to end the trade war with China and to drop tariffs.

Retail giants like Walmart, Target, Macy's and Gap wrote that they are worried tariffs will lead to job loss and will harm consumers and the U.S. economy.

CEOs have become increasingly outspoken on a variety of political issues — from race relations to LGBTQ rights to higher age restrictions on gun and tobacco sales.

The latest example of this corporate activism came this week, when the leaders of more than 180 businesses — including MAC Cosmetics, electronic payments company Square and clothing-maker Eileen Fisher — signed a letter opposing restrictive abortion laws enacted recently in several states.

A passenger waits for a Delta flight at the John Glenn Columbus International Airport on Friday, June 7, 2019.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

A line of passengers clutching suitcases and travel pillows form the TSA security line on a Friday morning at the John Glenn Columbus International Airport. They unload bags, pass through security and disperse throughout the airport – getting drinks, popping in headphones and settling into thin leather seats outside their gates.

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