Business & Economy

Slot machines inside Hollywood Casino in Columbus.
Kantele Franko / Associated Press

Slot machines will be ringing again as the Hollywood Casino Columbus reopens Friday. 

Updated: 11:28 a.m., Thursday, June 18, 2020

Cleveland is temporarily freezing the spread of dollar stores in city neighborhoods.

City council on Wednesday afternoon approved a moratorium on new zoning permits or occupancy licenses for small-box retail. The pause will last until Nov. 1, while the city drafts new regulations for such businesses.

Target is raising its starting wage to $15 an hour, making permanent a $2 salary bump the company gave its U.S. workers during the coronavirus pandemic.

Thazin Nu and her husband pose together during a recent hike in Mohican State Park.
Thazin Nu

WOSU's Letters from Home collects stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we heard from Ohioans answering the question: What are you adding back to your life as Ohio reopens?

Pool sales are making a splash during the pandemic. The Tri-State is mirroring a national trend as people avoid public pools and make an above ground or in-ground pool part of their staycation.

Festival goers crowd surf at the Rock On The Range Music Festival at Mapfre Stadium on Sunday, May 20, 2018, in Columbus.
Amy Harris / Invision/AP

Former Ohio Department of Health director Dr. Amy Acton is facing a lawsuit from the organizers of two summer music festivals, who argue their events should be able to take place.

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden announced on Thursday an expansive plan to restart the economy and protect public health during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, including federally funded testing for every worker called back on the job, guaranteed paid sick leave for workers affected by COVID-19 and a federally coordinated contact tracing workforce.

Updated at 4:07 p.m. ET

Stocks plunged Thursday amid reports of a second wave of coronavirus cases, as well as a warning from Fed officials that the economy may take longer than first thought to recover.

The past few months have weighed heavily on Edgar Fields. He has been meeting with workers at chicken processing plants across Georgia and in nearby states. His union represents them, and many have become sick. Some have died.

"You know, you lay in the bed and you can't sleep because stuff is on your mind? I've got to do this. I've got to do that," he says. "That's what I wake up in every morning thinking, 'What can I do to protect my members to where they have a safe work environment to go to?' "

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