Arts & Culture

Columbus Arts Festival has been canceled for 2020.
Joe Maiorana / Columbus Arts Festival

The start of summer might feel a bit different in Columbus this year. The Columbus Arts Festival has been cancelled because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Arts And COVID-19

Mar 30, 2020
Ohio Theatre
Jrdphotography / Wikimedia Commons

COVID-19 has hit the arts community particularly hard. Concerts, theaters, shows, museums and other performance venues are canceled or closed, leaving thousands with no work and giving new meaning to the “starving artist” label.

color photo of Scott Woods watching Tower Duo perofrm on a computer screen
Scott Woods / Streetlight Guild

Gov. Mike DeWine’s implementation of a statewide ban on large gatherings has put many Columbus-area musicians, at least temporarily, out of work during the coronavirus pandemic.

But thanks to a new online live concert series, the music will go on.

Ohio Alliance For Arts Education

Artists in financial need during the coronavirus shutdown can now apply for grants from the Greater Columbus Arts Council.

Updated Monday, Mar. 30 at 1:37 p.m.


Ongoing event cancellations and business closures in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic have thrust artists, music companies and behind-the-scenes entertainment workers into an unprecedented state of financial uncertainty.

Updated Friday 10:30 a.m.

In ancient times, a beast swept through a village eating crop, livestock and people on New Year's Eve. A wise old man told the villagers the beast fears red, fire and loud firecracker noises. So, villagers put red lanterns and banners at the entrance of their homes and played with firecrackers to scare the beast away.

WonderBus Festival takes place at CAS in Columbus.
WonderBus / Facebook

WonderBus Music And Arts Festival is keeping the wheels rolling for another seven years.

All Sides Weekend Arts and Culture: Holiday Specials

Nov 22, 2019
Jessica Lewis / Pexels

Today on All Sides Weekend with Christopher Purdy, a preview of the holiday sounds around the city, and more. 

Guests:

Five years after the death of Tamir Rice, his family is partnering with the Cleveland Foundation to create a fund for arts and community projects. The Tamir Rice Legacy Fund aims to connect youth with outlets for self-expression.

Samaria Rice created the fund in honor of her son’s love of art and says she hopes it will keep his memory alive.

The Evolution of Black Television

Oct 25, 2019

The Emmy-award winning series When They See Us was groundbreaking in depicting the systemic ills of the criminal justice system to the Central Park Five-who were all men of color.

The show follows a recent trend in television with black leads, which feature a wide array of stories that depict more dramatic, socially conscious themes. 

The evolution from shows such as Good Times of the 1970’s and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air of the 1990’s, to blackish and Queen Sugar of today shows a progression in messaging and themes.

All Sides Weekend: Arts and Culture

Oct 25, 2019
color photo of Ohio Theatre interior with Morton organ console
D.R. Goff / Columbus Association for the Performing Arts

Join guest host Christopher Purdy as he talks with a panel of experts about the latest in arts and culture around Columbus. 

As One, a thought-provoking story about Hannah, a transgender woman, and the reality of human nature is November 8 through 9 at the Southern Theatre.

 

Guests:  

Columbus Symphony / Facebook

The Columbus Symphony is taking on the Underground Railroad.

The Evolution Of Black Television

Oct 7, 2019
Flickr

The Emmy-award winning series When They See Us was groundbreaking in depicting the systemic ills of the criminal justice system to the Central Park Five-who were all men of color.

The show follows a recent trend in television with black leads, which feature a wide array of stories that depict more dramatic, socially conscious themes. 

The evolution from shows such as Good Times of the 1970’s and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air of the 1990’s, to blackish and Queen Sugar of today shows a progression in messaging and themes.

Desiree Buechner was the only person at the Ohio State Fair I met who thought Columbus had an accent.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Steve Pickett is fascinated by accents. “It tells you a lot about somebody,” he says.

A Cleveland native, Pickett moved to Columbus a decade ago for business school at The Ohio State University. After arriving, however, he was struck more by what he didn’t hear.

Ohio Alliance For Arts Education

"The arts are education."

It's as simple as that for Jarrod Hartzler, who spent more than half a decade as the executive and artistic director of Akron's Tuesday Musical before accepting the position as executive director at the Ohio Alliance For Arts Education.

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