Zach Klein

Police and demonstrators on Broad and High Streets.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus Police in riot gear returned to downtown Sunday afternoon, intent on forcing protesters out of city streets—and using chemicals like pepper spray to do so.

A Columbus Police officer aims a pepper spray cannister at a protester's face on May 30, 2020.
Katie Forbes / Kforbesphotography

Columbus will adopt a set of restrictions on police use of force known as #8CantWait, even as the campaign’s organizers insist the policies should be considered merely a first step. 

Franklin County jail in downtown Columbus.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

A small group of lawyers and activists known as the Columbus Freedom Fund has received tens of thousands of dollars in donations to bail out protesters arrested during recent demonstrations. The group's sudden rise to prominence, however, has raised questions: Who are they, and how exactly are they using the money?

Columbus Police confront protesters at a demonstration downtown on June 2, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus Police will no longer use tear gas to disperse peaceful crowds, Mayor Andrew Ginther announced Tuesday. 

Columbus Police confront protesters at a demonstration downtown on June 2, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus is planning to dismiss all charges against those arrested for breaking curfew during the last few weeks' protests.

A woman sits in the street with her fist raised while police gather on High Street.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus City Council members are calling for charges to be dropped against protesters arrested for violating curfew and "failure to disperse."

Columbus Police blockade the intersection of Broad and High Streets in downtown Columbus on May 30, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther has rescinded the citywide 10 p.m. curfew that was put in place last week. This comes after a federal lawsuit was filed claiming the curfew violated constitutional rights.

Mayor Andrew Ginther announces the selection of Tom Quinlan as the new Chief of Columbus Police, on Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2019.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

In a heated meeting, Columbus Police Chief Tom Quinlan and Mayor Andrew Ginther checked in with the Safety Advisory Commission to give a progress report on reform recommendations and gather feedback on police response to protests.

Protesters on the sidewalk of the Ohio Statehouse face Columbus Police officers, who stood in the middle of High Street, on June 1, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus City Attorney Zach Klein is recommending the appointment of a special counsel to perform an independent investigation into Columbus Division of Police, following complaints about the department's use of force during recent protests.

Lucky Bones is one of several hundred businesses reported to Franklin County Public Health since the stay-at-home order went into effect.
David Holm / WOSU

At Lucky Bones, a pet grooming and day care center in Canal Winchester, the outgoing message on their voicemail is chipper but blunt: “We have just been informed by the state of Ohio that we have to close our business and all services until further notice."

Columbus Police Car
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

As Ohio's stay-at-home order continues, Columbus Police reports that domestic violence calls are on the rise. That's spurred the Columbus City Attorney to start offering a texting service to help victims.

City Atty. Zach Klein and Columbus Councilmember Shayla Favor.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus City Attorney Zach Klein is cracking down on house parties, saying too many people are ignoring gathering restrictions during the coronavirus pandemic.

The new CHOICES domestic violence shelter which opened in January and can accomodate up to 120 people and currently has a waitlist of more than 40 people.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Sue Villilo directs LSS CHOICES For Victims Of Domestic Violence. At their shelter in Columbus, the phone lines have been less busy these past few weeks.

“We actually have a little bit of a dip in seeking services right now. I think to some extent that isn’t too surprising,” Villilo says. “It’s probably harder for people to contact us if they’re in the home with the abuser.”

City Atty. Zach Klein and Columbus Councilmember Shayla Favor.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus City Attorney Zach Klein is expressing alarm after Columbus saw three domestic violence homicides in three weeks. 

Paradise Garage co-owner Emily Monnig. The bike shop has shifted to a curbside model amid the COVID-19 outbreak.
Nick Evans / WOSU

A slow but steady stream of people pass through Beechwold Hardware in Clintonville. On the floor in front of the counter, the owners have put down yellow tape to maintain social distancing between customers and workers.

Pages