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Wright State University

The office of the Ohio Inspector General (OIG) has found evidence of wrongdoing by a non-profit associated with Wright State University. The investigation released Tuesday centers on Double Bowler, the real estate management company established by Wright State in 2014.

Ohio Higher Education officials will review the results a faculty no-confidence vote against Wright State’s Board of Trustees. On Monday, members of Wright State’s faculty approved the no-confidence action by a wide margin. The vote is an appeal for assistance by the faculty to the governor’s office.

More than half of Wright State’s faculty members weighed in, with 87 percent voting no confidence in the Board of Trustees.

No-confidence votes are largely symbolic, according to Sean McKinniss, a researcher who specializes in university governance.

Wright State University’s faculty union has launched a GoFundMe page to raise money. Organizers say any donations raised during the fundraising campaign will reimburse union members for pay they lost during Wright State’s recent strike. The so-called AAUP-WSU Strike Fund has a goal of raising $500,000.

Wright State University

After 20 days, the faculty union strike at Wright State University has ended.

With the help of a federal mediator, union and administration negotiators reached a tentative agreement late Sunday night.

Governor Mike DeWine says his administration has no plans to intervene in the Wright State faculty strike. The strike is in its sixteenth day and no contract negotiations are scheduled. This week, the university authorized the hiring of longterm substitutes to replace striking faculty.

In a statement, Wright State officials say any replacement instructors who fill in during the strike would be temporary, qualified and asked to commit to teaching the rest of the semester.

Wright State University’s faculty union resumed picketing this week after weekend negotiations failed to reach a deal. The strike has so far lasted more than two weeks with no word yet on when contract negotiations could resume.  

Despite reassurances from Wright State administration officials, who maintain they're working to minimize disruptions on campus, many Wright State students are reporting frustration over disruptions to their classes.

The Wright State faculty union strike is in its fourteenth day. And while negotiations resumed over the weekend between the administration and the union, no agreement was reached.

So, Monday afternoon union members returned to the picket lines, joined by dozens of students and community members.

The picket line stretched for almost an entire block near the entrance to Wright State’s Fairborn campus. 

Lining the curb were more than 100 people cheering in support of striking faculty members.

Negotiations resumed Friday between the Wright State University administration and the faculty union, 11 days after the faculty strike began.

The walkout has now gone on longer than all but one higher-education strikes last year.

William Herbert, director of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education, says that while most strikes are typically resolved within a week it’s not unheard of for them to last longer.

Wright State University’s faculty union strike could affect the school’s credit rating if it continues much longer, according to an analyst for Moody’s Investor Services. A lower credit rating could make it more difficult for Wright State to take out loans.

Only two years ago, Moody’s lowered Wright State’s credit rating three notches from A2 to Baa2. At the time, analysts said the school’s, “severe financial deterioration in a short period of time," led to the downgrade.

The Wright State Board of Trustees spent more than two hours discussing contract negotiations in an executive session Tuesday night, but didn’t announce a new contract deal. That means the American Association of University Professors strike will likely continue for at least another day.

Representatives from the union and the administration met for several hours Sunday and Monday, but additional negotiating sessions have not yet been announced.

It’s been nearly a week since members of Wright State University’s faculty union walked off the job. Now, union and administration officials are reporting they’re optimistic a deal to end the strike will be reached soon.

Union and university representatives say they made progress on a new contract deal during a four-hour meeting Sunday. It was the first time the two parties met since the strike began.

With no deal in sight, Wright State’s faculty union is on the picket lines for a fourth day Friday With temperatures hovering in the teens, union members have turned a conference room in a hotel across from the main campus into their strike headquarters. 

WYSO’s April Laissle got an inside look at the space on Thursday, and talked to one union member about what it’s been like on the picket lines.

Faculty members picket at the entrance to Wright State University's campus Tuesday, January 22.
APRIL LAISSLE / WYSO

An Ohio labor board has ruled the faculty strike at Wright State University can continue.

In the past two and a half years, staff members at Wright State, who are not unionized, have experienced major budget cuts, changes to their benefits, and several rounds of layoffs. Now, as the faculty union strike enters its second day, the university is relying on them to cover for striking professors.

Hundreds of members of Wright State’s faculty union walked off the job Tuesday. The university's chapter of the American Association of University Professors union announced its intent to strike earlier this month after contract talks stalled.

With temperatures hovering in the teens, about 100 students chanted as they marched across Wright State’s campus to join professors on the picket lines.

A newly formed pro-union student group called WSU Students for Faculty organized the march.

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