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Connect with all your favorite stories and programs from 89.7 NPR News, Classical 101, and WOSU TV on Instagram. Enriching lives and expanding minds in Central Ohio, now with more photos.

Rick Hodges and Jim Obergefell
storycorps / WOSU

The landmark 2015 U.S. Supreme Court decision on "Obergefell v. Hodges" legalized same-sex marriage. In the case, Cincinnati real estate broker Jim Obergefell sued the state of Ohio for refusing to recognize his marriage to his husband John Arthur on Arthur’s death certificate after he died from ALS.

Map depicting American Indian trails in Ohio from the book "Archeological Atlas of Ohio," by William C. Mills
Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society / Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County

Before Europeans settled here, Ohio was home to many different indigeonous cultures. From the Adena and Hopewell people, who constructed massive earthworks such as the Serpent Mound, to the Lenape or Delaware people, who were forced from their lands on the East Coast by expanding colonies.

Yolanda Zepeda and Elena Foulis
storycorps / wosu

Friends and colleagues Elena Foulis and Yolanda Zepeda find joy in sharing traditional Latin American recipes with others. In this conversation for StoryCorps COLUMBUS, they talk about their favorite foods, and how they’ve introduced their spouses to different dishes, including lesser known delicacies like "menudo," a Mexican tripe soup.

A creek (left) contaminated with acid mine drainage flows past a local rural road while the Carbondale doser (right) works to neutralize some of the acidity before it reaches local streams.
Curren Sheldon / 100 Days In Appalachia

In 1958, researchers from the University of Louisville and the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission gathered at a lock on the Monongahela River for routine collecting, counting and comparing of fish species. 

WOSU

From Columbus City Council to the school board, the Franklin County Democratic Party maintained its dominance of city government on Tuesday. See the full results from the 2019 election below.

Nancy Recchie and Jeff Darbee
storycorps

Nancy Recchie and Jeff Darbee had their hearts broken when crews demolished one of Columbus’s most famous landmarks. But the loss of the historic building also started their lives together.

Jonathon W. Tolbert III and his son, Jonathon W. Tolbert IV
storycorps

John W. Tolbert III and his son, Jonathan W. Tolbert IV, remember the legacy of Marshall "Major" Taylor, a professional African American cyclist who stormed the cycling scene and broke racial barriers in the late 1800s.

Major Taylor became the inspiration for a Columbus-based bicycle club that’s now 40 years old. John III told his son they didn’t know much about cycling when they started, and none of them had heard of the man who would be the club’s namesake.   

photo of  John and Jane Byrnes
storycorp

Katie Byrnes was born deaf, but this didn’t stop her from finding ways to relate to others.

Her parents, Jayne and John Byrnes remember Katie’s earliest signs of communicating, her intelligence and love of music. Even though Katie passed at the young age of five-years-old, she had an incredible impact on the deaf community.

Columbus Crew and city officials at the groundbreaking for the team's new downtown stadium on Oct. 10, 2019.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Columbus Crew SC broke ground on its new downtown stadium Thursday afternoon. Over 4,000 fans cheered as city officials and Haslam Sports Group executives dug ceremonial shovels into dirt at the Arena District site.

Brutus, an Eastern screech owl, shown off at an Audubon event on Oct. 10, 2019.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

New research from the National Audubon Society finds two-thirds of North American birds are at risk of extinction due to climate change.

Cecily King, right, and her daughter Odessa hang a sign that says "If You're Going Through Hell Keep Going" over a Columbus highway.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

You are enough. You are valuable. You are worthy.

Mantras like these have been appearing on highway overpasses and bridges across Columbus over the last few months.

Desiree Buechner was the only person at the Ohio State Fair I met who thought Columbus had an accent.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Steve Pickett is fascinated by accents. “It tells you a lot about somebody,” he says.

A Cleveland native, Pickett moved to Columbus a decade ago for business school at The Ohio State University. After arriving, however, he was struck more by what he didn’t hear.

A computer-generated image of a black hole ripping up a star. The phenomenon was spotted by a NASA satellite and an Ohio State telescope network.
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

A NASA satellite and a network of robotic telescopes at The Ohio State University gave astronomers a look at a black hole ripping up a star. 

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

At first glance, the people inside Franklin County Municipal Court room 13C have little in common. There’s a man in cutoff jean shorts with tattooed arms. Behind him sits a younger woman with freckles who looks like she came from soccer practice.

The group is bound together by circumstance: All were addicted to opioids and got in trouble with the law.

CATCH Court graduate Melissa Callaway hugs her sister.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Graduates walked into the atrium of the Ohio Statehouse, greeted by cheers from their friends and loved ones. One by one, they step up to the microphone.

“I spent 37 years of my life a homeless drug addict, a victim of human trafficking on the streets of Columbus,” says Barb Davis. “I truly knew it was my destiny to die out there.”

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