work requirements

A federal appeals court has upheld a lower court decision blocking states' requirements that people must work in order to receive Medicaid.

Residents of Kentucky and Arkansas brought the action against Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar, contending that Azar "acted in an arbitrary and capricious manner when he approved Medicaid demonstration requests for Kentucky and Arkansas."

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit agreed, writing in an opinion posted Friday that the secretary's authorization was indeed unlawful.

Changes to regulations of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) will soon take away benefits for thousands of Ohioans.

At least 29 counties are losing access to a waiver that makes the benefits more accessible. In those counties alone, about 20,000 people will lose food assistance benefits completely, said Loren Anthes, public policy fellow for the Center for Community Solutions.

Updated at 12:59 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is tightening work requirements for some food stamp recipients, a change that is expected to eliminate Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits for 688,000 adults.

A job application with a pen.
Flazingo / Flickr

Advocates are worried about the process that will eventually require thousands of Ohioans in Medicaid expansion to work 20 hours a week or lose their benefits, which the state got permission to impose earlier this year.

Maureen Corcoran is sworn in as Ohio Medicaid director by Gov. Mike DeWine in January.
Ohio Medicaid / Twitter

Ohio residents who will face work requirements to continue receiving Medicaid health care coverage won't lose their benefits until after they have spoken to a caseworker, according to a proposed state plan.

Updated Aug. 27, 2019, 9:55 a.m. ET

The Trump administration is moving forward with a wave of new rules and regulations that would make it more difficult for low-income Americans — especially those in families that include non-citizens — to get government aid. NPR detailed many of the proposals in June, but there have been several developments since then.

pride flag
Karen Desuyo / Flickr

A national survey finds LGBTQ Midwesterners and their families are more likely to receive public assistance than non-LGBTQ people.

Three-quarters of a million people would likely lose their food stamps later this year under a new proposal by the Trump administration. The goal is to encourage able-bodied adults to go to work and get off government aid. But opponents predict people would go hungry instead, if the rule goes into effect.

A public comment period, which ends Tuesday, has so far drawn more than 28,000 comments overwhelmingly against the proposed rule.

Pixabay

A U.S. District Court judge has thrown out Medicaid work requirements in two states, saying they are “arbitrary and capricious.”  Ohio is now reviewing its plan to impose work requirements on recipients of Medicaid expansion, which was just approved by the federal government two weeks ago.

For a second time in nine months, the same federal judge has struck down the Trump administration's plan to force some Medicaid recipients to work to maintain benefits.

As of last Friday, the state has federal permission to require 20 hours of work per week for many non-disabled people on Medicaid expansion.  The state’s Medicaid director has put a number on how many people might be affected – and how much it might cost to put those requirements in place.

The federal government says Ohio can join the eight other states that have been given permission to impose work requirements on people in Medicaid expansion.

State Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima)
Ohio Senate

Ohio is among 15 states that have asked the federal government for permission to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients. Ohio’s request would cover people up to age 50, but a state senator has proposed a bill that would go further.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. EST

Flanked by Democratic and Republican lawmakers, President Trump Thursday signed into the law the 2018 farm bill touting it as a "bipartisan success," even though it lacked the administration's much-sought-after changes to the food stamp program.

"We're here to celebrate a really tremendous victory for the American farmer," Trump said at the signing ceremony. "We've been working long and hard on this one."

Lawmakers unveiled the much-anticipated farm bill compromise Monday night, ending the months-long impasse over whether a critical piece of legislation that provides subsidies to farmers and helps needy Americans buy groceries could pass before the lame-duck session concludes at the end of the year.

Pages