women's health

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While the number of minorities living in the U.S. is expected to exceed 50 percent by 2044, there is a significant lack in representation of these communities among medical researchers and study participants. Today we look into efforts being made to improve inclusion of minorities in such research, including a new study that will ensure 51 percent of its one million participants come from underrepresented groups.

We then discuss the benefits of exercise on health with New York Times Well Blog columnist Gretchen Reynolds and take a look at women's health ahead of Mother's Day.

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

Three national reproductive rights groups are suing the Trump administration, arguing that changes to the federal Title X program will put the health of millions of low-income patients at risk by prioritizing practices such as the rhythm method over comprehensive sexual health services.

Niraj Antani
Niraj Antani / Ohio House

A new bill has been introduced in the Ohio House that would require health classes cover fetal development and offer students information on where they can find prenatal care. But it doesn’t include other related information.

Updated on April 19 at 3 p.m. ET

Maile Pearl Bowlsbey is just over a week old and already is helping force more change in the Senate than most seasoned lawmakers can even dream. On Thursday she joined her mother, Illinois Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth, on the Senate floor for a vote.

The newborn's appearance was made possible by a unanimous decision by the Senate on Wednesday evening to change its rules, which typically allow only senators and a handful of staff into the Senate chamber during votes. Now, lawmakers can bring along children under 1.

London Scout / Unsplash

During her second pregnancy, 25-year old Jessica Roach thought she would have a smooth experience, like the first one, but her health deteriorated.

An Ohio fertility clinic said that the remote alarm system on its storage tank was turned off, so it didn't know that the temperature had fluctuated, and that the consequences were worse than it initially thought — all 4,000 eggs and embryos in the cryofreezer are likely nonviable.

When journalist Maya Dusenbery was in her 20s, she started experiencing progressive pain in her joints, which she learned was caused by rheumatoid arthritis.

As she began to research her own condition, Dusenbery realized how lucky she was to have been diagnosed relatively easily. Other women with similar symptoms, she says, "experienced very long diagnostic delays and felt ... that their symptoms were not taken seriously."

In June 2017, protestors dressed in costumes from the dystopian TV series "The Handmaid's Tale" sit in a committee hearing to oppose a bill banning a common procedure used in second-trimester abortions.
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

A newly introduced bill from Ohio Republicans that would outlaw abortion entirely is getting a lot of attention on social media and around water coolers. But will it get serious consideration from lawmakers, especially considering some abortion bills – including far less extreme proposals – have not passed? 

ChapStick, Viagra and dandruff shampoo. These are just three of the thousands of health and personal care items that are exempt from sales tax in many U.S. states. Notably missing from that list: menstrual products.

Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

After a federal judge put the brakes on Ohio’s latest abortion restrictions, a group of Republican lawmakers are trying to take a step even further: banning all abortions in Ohio.

Abortions in the United States are safe and have few complications, according to a landmark new study by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

The report, called "The Safety and Quality of Abortion Care in the United States," examined the four major methods used for abortions — medication, aspiration, dilation and evacuation, and induction — and examined women's care from before they had the procedure through their follow-up care.

Columbus Public Health Dept.

Columbus public health officials say they can save lives by giving women addicted to drugs an easier way to care for their reproductive health care needs. At the CompDrug facility on the city's North Side, about 700 women are getting help from a new clinic that hopes to not just save lives, but improve them.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio filed a complaint Thursday on behalf of several abortion providers seeking to block a state law that bans abortions "because an unborn child has or may have Down Syndrome."

Governor John Kasich signed House Bill 214 into law late last year, although it is not scheduled to take effect until March 23, 2018.

It was Julie Liles' 17-year-old daughter, Emily, who suggested that they attend a sex education program together.

Julie was eager to go. She was just 14 when she gave birth to Emily.

"So always in the back of my mind was a worry that she would get hurt," says Julie, her voice cracking. "I worried in the back of my mind that she would find herself in the same situation."

Ohio Supreme Court Rules Against Two Abortion Clinics

Feb 6, 2018
Wikipedia Commons

The Ohio Supreme Court has delivered a pair of blows to abortion clinics in Toledo and Cleveland.

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