women's health

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An Ohio appeals court has upheld a state order revoking a Dayton abortion clinic's license.

Abortion protesters at the Ohio Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

The Ohio Senate has passed a bill that requires remains of some abortions be buried or cremated.

A law making it harder for women in North Carolina to get an abortion after 20 weeks is unconstitutional, a federal judge has declared.

The law, which had been on the books since 1973, banned abortion after 20 weeks with only certain exceptions to protect the life of the mother. A 2015 amendment tightened those exceptions, criminalizing abortion unless the woman's life or a "major bodily function" were at immediate risk. Pro-abortion rights groups challenged the law, and on Monday U.S. District Judge William Osteen sided with them.

Matt Rourke / Associated Press

More babies lived to celebrate their first birthdays last year, according to a new data from Columbus Public Health.  

Days after its official publication, a new Trump administration rule dramatically overhauling the federal Title X family planning program is facing multiple legal challenges.

State attorneys general and women's health advocates who are hoping to block in court new Trump administration rules for Title X, the federal family planning program, face one major obstacle: The Supreme Court upheld very similar rules in 1991.

Those rules were summarily canceled after a change in administrations. But the court is arguably more conservative than it was 28 years ago.

The Trump administration has issued its final draft of a rule that makes sweeping changes to Title X, the federal program that provides birth control and other reproductive health services to millions of low-income Americans.

This photo taken June 5, 2012, outside the statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, shows a large balloon in support of the "Heartbeat Bill."
Ann Sanner / Associated Press

The "Heartbeat Bill" abortion ban is on its fifth try through the legislature, after being passed and vetoed in the lame duck session.

'Heartbeat Bill' Back Before Ohio Lawmakers

Feb 12, 2019
This photo taken June 5, 2012, outside the statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, shows a large balloon in support of the "Heartbeat Bill."
Ann Sanner / Associated Press

Republican lawmakers in Ohio proposed again on Monday one of the most restrictive abortion measures in the nation, and this time around, they have the governor's support.

Volunteers at the Buren Shelter assemble bags of free tampons for shelter residents.
Esther Honig / WOSU

Once again, a proposal to eliminate sales tax on feminine hygiene products has resurfaced in the Ohio Legislature. This time, it has bi-partisan co-sponsors and has a companion bill that goes one step further.

This photo taken June 5, 2012, outside the statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, shows a large balloon in support of the "Heartbeat Bill."
Ann Sanner / Associated Press

The leader of the Ohio House says the controversial “Heartbeat Bill,” which bans abortion at the point a fetal heartbeat is detected, is not a priority for the new session. But Speaker Larry Householder says lawmakers still want to pass it. 

This photo taken June 5, 2012, outside the statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, shows a large balloon in support of the "Heartbeat Bill."
Ann Sanner / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss why a "Heartbeat Bill" that would ban abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detected garnered new support this week. Ohio State law professor Marc Spindelman joins the show.

Melody Lynch-Kimery had a fairly routine pregnancy. But when she got to the hospital for delivery, she says things quickly turned dangerous.

Need another reason to get the flu shot if you're pregnant?

A study out this week shows that pregnant women with the flu who are hospitalized in an intensive care unit are four times more likely to deliver babies prematurely and four and a half times more likely to have a baby of low birth weight.

Sayyid Azim / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich has signed a law criminalizing female genital mutilation, or FGM.

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