water

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

The Environmental Protection Agency is dramatically reducing the amount of U.S. waterways that get federal protection under the Clean Water Act — a move that is welcomed by many farmers, builders and mining companies but is opposed even by the agency's own science advisers.

The Supreme Court on Tuesday cleared the way for water crisis victims to sue state and local government officials in Flint, Mich.

For years, Flint city officials and state regulators have argued that they are protected by "qualified immunity" from being sued for their role in the water contamination crisis. But lower courts have ruled to the contrary.

Jim Casto stands up against the tiled river height gauge along the entrance of the floodwall in Huntington, West Virginia.
Liam Niemeyer / Ohio Valley ReSource

When 78-year-old Jim Casto looks at the towering floodwalls that line downtown Huntington, West Virginia, he sees a dark history of generations past. 

'Dark Waters' And The Battle Against DuPont

Dec 23, 2019
Mark Ruffalo as Robert Bilott in the film "Dark Waters."
Dark Waters / Focus Features

The new film “Dark Waters” starring Mark Ruffalo recalls the two-decade long legal battle with one of the world’s biggest corporations—DuPont—to expose the truth about so-called "forever chemicals." The Cincinnati attorney at the heart of the story has written his own memoir of the story.

Jason Flickner walks on the exposed fossil beds at the Falls of the Ohio State Park.
Jeff Brooks-Gillies / Environmental Health News

When Jason Flickner was a kid, he built a dam on the creek behind his grandparents' house causing it to flood a neighbor’s basement.

Manhole cover
Atiya / Pixabay

Franklin County Commissioners vote Tuesday on raising rates for sewer and water customers. 

Dave Reutter and Kyle Wilson stand along a stream in Willow Brook.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Rows of nearly identical houses run along gently meandering roads in Jefferson Township’s Willow Brook subdivision. It’s suburban, but tucked in here is a pretty innovative environmental project.

On "good" bad days, the shells lie open at the bottom of the river, shimmering in the refracted sunlight. Their insides, pearl white and picked clean of flesh, flicker against the dark riverbed like a beacon, alerting the world above to a problem below.

For many people, turning on the tap or flushing the toilet is something we take for granted. But a report released Monday, called "Closing the Water Access Gap in the United States," shows that more than 2 million Americans live without these conveniences and that Native Americans are more likely to have trouble accessing water than any other group.

A creek (left) contaminated with acid mine drainage flows past a local rural road while the Carbondale doser (right) works to neutralize some of the acidity before it reaches local streams.
Curren Sheldon / 100 Days In Appalachia

In 1958, researchers from the University of Louisville and the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission gathered at a lock on the Monongahela River for routine collecting, counting and comparing of fish species. 

The Cincinnati skyline and John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge is seen from the banks of the Ohio River, Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018, in Covington, Ky.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

In June 1969, a Time Magazine article garnered national attention when it brought to light the water quality conditions in Ohio: a river had literally caught fire. 

A new report examining water accessibility in “water-rich” Ohio shows affordability is an issue for residents in both urban and rural areas.

The study from the Alliance for the Great Lakes and Ohio Environmental Council shows that while water costs are essentially the same across the state, households in lower income brackets have more difficulty paying for service.

In nearly 80 percent of Ohio communities, a month of basic water and sewer service costs more than eight hours of minimum-wage labor, according to the report.

Eight years of work finally paid off Friday with the official designation of the Cuyahoga River as an Ohio Water Trail.

The new Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) trail designation means paddlers will have signage, amenities and access points to guide them along the more than 90-mile Cuyahoga River.

As the world's climate changes, ocean warming is accelerating and sea levels are rising more quickly, warns a new report by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

The report is a synthesis of the most up-to-date climate science on oceans and ice, and it lays out a stark reality: Ocean surface temperatures have been warming steadily since 1970, and for the past 25 years or so, they've been warming twice as fast.

After three months of record high water, Lake Erie water levels are starting their seasonal decline, according to the Army Corps of Engineers.

“Lake Erie did establish new record highs for the month of May, for the month of June and the month of July,” said Keith Kompoltowicz, Chief of Watershed Hydrology for the Corps’ Detroit District office. “The June monthly mean is the highest recorded level over the past 100 years. So it has never been higher in any month going back to 1918.”

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