Voting Rights

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose marks National Registration Day at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019.
Julie Carr Smyth / Associated Press

The Ohio Secretary of State’s office is going forward with legally-mandated voter list maintenance—the so-called "purge" of inactive voters from the rolls. But no names will be removed prior to November’s election.

Jim OBryan drops of his election ballot in the drop box at the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections, Wednesday, April 22, 2020, in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Voting rights groups say they fear the possible consolidation of polling places this November, due to the ongoing pandemic, will lead to long lines like the ones Ohioans experienced in 2004. 

Felicita Subhita, left, reviews her ballot as she uses curbside voting services during early voting Friday, Nov. 2, 2018, in San Diego.
Gregory Bull / AP

Ohio voters with disabilities already have the option of curbside voting on Election Day. But a group representing voters suggest that option could be expanded to help medically fragile people who cannot mask themselves and walk into polls this November.

Must be some deep thinkers in Columbus at Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost's office.

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose, overseeing the Election Night Reporting Center, in Columbus, Ohio, calls for the closing of the polls in the Ohio primary election, Tuesday, April 28, 2020.
Gene Puskar / Associated Press

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose has ordered the Greene County Board of Elections to reject non-citizen voter registrations in the village of Yellow Springs.

How Mail-in Voting Works In Ohio: A Step-By-Step Guide

Aug 2, 2020

Mail-in or absentee voting has in the past only accounted for a small percentage of all votes cast nationwide. But as a global pandemic stops normal life for most Americans, an unprecedented number of states are encouraging voting by mail, including Ohio and Kentucky.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

President Trump on Thursday mused about delaying this year's election based on unsupported conspiracy theorizing about the integrity of voting during the coronavirus disaster.

Trump used a Twitter post to repeat what has become a pet theme about what he calls the prospect of inaccuracies or fraud with mail-in voting.

As the coronavirus pandemic has upended normal balloting, more than half of voters under the age of 35 say they don't have the resources or knowledge they need to vote by mail in November, according to a new poll.

The poll was conducted by Global Strategy Group for NextGen America, a group that is focused primarily on engaging and turning out young voters.

Updated at 11:56 a.m. ET

With about 100 days left before the general election, officials are simultaneously trying to prepare for two very different types of voting, while facing two unprecedented threats to safety and security. It's a juggling act that has voters, political parties and officials anxious about how smoothly November's voting will go.

"Doubt is our enemy," U.S. Sen. Angus King, an independent from Maine, said at a Senate hearing Wednesday on what Congress can do to ensure public confidence in this year's election results.

Sometime soon - very soon - Ohio's chief elections officer, Secretary of State Frank LaRose, is going to have to make a decision: Does he make it easier for people with absentee ballots to return them to their county boards of election, or does he make it harder?

Franklin County Board of Elections during the delayed spring election on April 28, 2020.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

In four months, Ohio voters will cast their ballots. Election officials are trying to make sure everyone who wants to vote can, while keeping everyone safe from the pandemic that's currently surging around the country.

Mail-in voting, which tens of millions of Americans are expected to use this November, is fraught with potential problems. Hundreds of thousands of ballots go uncounted each year because people make mistakes, such as forgetting to sign the form or sending it in too late.

Ever since the pandemic struck, state and local election officials across the country have made it clear: To avoid an election disaster in November, they need more money now.

Security outside of the Franklin County Board of Elections on Tuesday, April 28, 2020.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

Ohio has more of an idea about what this November’s election will look like, after the Secretary of State handed down a directive to all 88 county boards of elections.

President Trump has made it clear that he does not support allowing all registered voters access to mail ballots this fall, even during a pandemic. But he keeps changing his story about why he's opposed.

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