ventilators

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

The renewed surge in coronavirus cases has left some states once again scrambling to find supplies of masks, gowns, gloves and other medical supplies. The shortages have drawn attention to President Trump's plan to help rebuild the national stockpile of these supplies — a plan that involves a little-known foreign investment agency.

Brazil, the second worst country in the world for COVID-19 cases, is getting some help from Cincinnati. The new non-profit Venti-Now will send ventilators there for free that it designed, built and tested in just three weeks. Tanzania is also on the list to get them.

Wellness Wednesday: Ventilators And COVID-19

Jun 17, 2020
A nurse pulls a ventilator into an exam room where a patient with COVID-19 went into cardiac arrest at St. Joseph's Hospital in Yonkers, N.Y on April 20, 2020.
John Minchillo / AP

Unusually high death rates among coronavirus patients on ventilators have been reported at hospitals across the U.S. and around the world, sparking concern among doctors that the breathing machines could be hurting certain patients.

Richards Industrials in Oakley makes all kinds of valves. It's products can be found in chemical plants, pharmaceutical plants, refineries, food and beverage manufacturing plants - basically anywhere around the world where product is moved through a pipe, you might find a valve from the Cincinnati-based company.

That now includes in ventilator testing machines by companies making the life-saving pieces of equipment.

Updated at 12:50 p.m.

Auto giant General Motors will build 30,000 medical ventilators for the national stockpile, at a cost of $489.4 million, the Department of Health and Human Services announced Wednesday.

A photo of a COVID-19 ventilator prototype being developed by a Columbus furniture maker.
Tarik Yousef

Tarik Yousef runs TY Fine Furniture in Clintonville. But with his store shuttered, Yousef has devoted his time to building a ventilator he hopes can help meet the sudden demand caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Coronavirus In Ohio: Hospitals Remain Quiet On Bed And Ventilator Counts

Apr 3, 2020
Urgent care at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, on March 31, 2020.
David Holm / WOSU

The Ohio Department of Health gets daily updates on the total number of beds and ventilators that could be available for COVID-19 patients at hospitals throughout the state. But so far the agency hasn’t provided any hospital-by-hospital breakdown, and the agencies that collect capacity information on their behalf have also declined to release their assessments.

Dr. Amy Acton, Ohio Department of Health director, speaks at a coronavirus briefing.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

The state will start tracking ventilators through a new database as part of the ongoing effort to build up capacity for the projected peak of coronavirus in Ohio.

President Trump ordered General Motors and health care vendor Ventec to begin producing ventilators on Friday, invoking a Cold War-era law that grants him such authority.

Trump, who complained earlier on Friday about what he called problems with GM and its CEO, Mary Barra, said in a statement that the automaker was taking too long to conclude the deal.

President Trump unloaded on Detroit's big two American automakers on Friday with complaints and exhortations about how they must begin producing ventilators for the coronavirus pandemic.

Trump first complained about what he suggested was a breakdown in negotiations with General Motors CEO Mary Barra and then said both GM and Ford must devote some of their production capacity to medical equipment immediately.