valentine's day

Dawn McCombs and John-Paul Byrne.
StoryCorps COLUMBUS / WOSU

John-Paul Byrne took a risk by putting a personal ad in the Village Voice, a weekly New York City newspaper, far from his home in Sydney, Australia. Dawn McCombs responded and a long-distance romance ensued.

Chefs In The City: Romantic Eats

Feb 7, 2020
White Castle
Thomas Hawk / Flickr

February 14 is the time for tablecloths, candle lights and romantic Valentine’s Day dinners out. Local restaurants are cooking up lavish and delicious dishes to share. 

We just can't resist when puns are involved.

If you planned on wooing your sweetheart with, well, Sweethearts this year, you may need to make other arrangements. The chalky hearts imprinted with such sayings as "Be Mine," "Let's Kiss" and "Cutie Pie" aren't being made this year. 

Nicknamed the "hippie ape," bonobos have plenty of love to go around. So it was only fitting the Cincinnati Zoo is celebrating them on Valentine's Day, which is also World Bonobo Day.

To celebrate Valentine's Day, you can buy a sappy card. Or a silly one.

Or, you can buy one that takes on Islamophobia with messages like "This burka is built for two" and "First Muslim Registry ... Then Wedding Registry."

These are some of the valentine creations of Tanzila Ahmed, a Los-Angeles-based writer, artist, activist and co-host of the podcast #GoodMuslimBadMuslim.

The messages make people laugh — and squirm. And that was absolutely her intention, Ahmed says.

Valentine's Day is a time to celebrate romance and love and kissy-face fealty. But the origins of this festival of candy and cupids are actually dark, bloody — and a bit muddled.

A heart-shaped box of chocolate is a sign of love, a symbol — and often tool — of romance, and an intrinsic part of Valentine's Day.

From at least the time of the Aztecs, chocolate has been seen as an aphrodisiac. So it's reasonable to assume that it has been connected to love's dedicated day of celebration for many centuries. But, that isn't the case.