Vaccines

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports 695 measles cases in 22 states.

"This is the greatest number of cases reported in the United States since measles was eliminated from this country in 2000," says a CDC statement issued late Wednesday.

The Measles Outbreak And Anti-Vaccine Movement

Apr 16, 2019
Pixabay

The Centers for Disease Control announced this week that the number of measles cases nationwide has risen to more than 500, the second-highest number since measles was supposedly eradicated in the U.S. in 2000.

Experts point to outbreaks around the world and the fact that more families are traveling overseas and returning with the highly contagious disease to pockets of the country where anti-vaccine movements have gained footholds.

Today on Wellness Wednesday on All Sides with Ann Fisher: measles and the anti-vaccine movement. 

Measles is surging. Last week the U.S. recorded 90 cases, making this year's outbreak the second largest in more than two decades.

So far this year, the U.S. has confirmed 555 measles cases, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Monday. That's 50 percent higher than the total number recorded last year, even though we're only about a quarter of the way through 2019.

And the virus isn't slowing down.

Ethan Lindenberger testifies during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines, focusing on preventable disease outbreaks.
Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

An Ohio teen defied his mother's anti-vaccine beliefs and started getting his shots when he turned 18 — and told Congress on Tuesday that it's crucial to counter fraudulent claims on social media that scare parents.

With the flu season less than half over, at least two young people in Ohio have died from the illness, including a 13-year-old Cleveland girl last week.

Dr. John Bower is an infectious disease specialist at Akron Children’s Hospital. He said some patients are concerned that the vaccine will actually bring on the flu, or that it simply is not effective.

Air Force Senior Airman Antoinette Fowler shows a 4-year-old how to give a vaccination during a teddy bear clinic at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.
Ilka Cole / U.S. Air Force

As public health officials in Washington state scramble to contain a measles outbreak in the Pacific Northwest, some of their counterparts in Ohio suggest it is time to change the state law that allows parents to easily opt out of vaccinations.

Ethan Lindenberger is getting vaccinated for well, just about everything.

He's 18 years old, but had never received vaccines for diseases like hepatitis, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, or the chickenpox.

Fort George G. Meade Public Affairs Office/Flickr

For older Ohioans, there’s some good and some bad news.  A new shingles vaccine is markedly better than previous options, but the drugmaker is having a hard time keeping up with demand.

Each year, about 31,000 men and women in the U.S. are diagnosed with a cancer caused by an infection from the human papillomavirus, or HPV. It's the most common sexually transmitted virus and infection in the U.S.

In women, HPV infection can lead to cervical cancer, which leads to about 4,000 deaths per year. In men, it can cause penile cancer. HPV also causes some cases of oral cancer, cancer of the anus and genital warts.

Federal health officials say that, as they anticipated, the flu vaccine isn't very effective this year — but they say it has still prevented thousands of serious illnesses and deaths.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention figures that, overall, the flu vaccine is 36 percent effective at preventing disease. One bright point for parents of young kids: Children ages 6 months to 8 years responded significantly better to the vaccine than older Americans.

vaccination
Columbus Neighborhoods / WOSU

Earlier this month, word of a measles outbreak came from the Twin Cities in Minnesota. The majority of the 64 people affected were Somali-American. 

All four of Anab Gulaid's children have received their vaccinations on the recommended schedule. As Somali-American residents of Minneapolis, that puts them in the minority.

Fewer than half of Minnesota children of Somali descent have received the MMR shot that protects against measles, mumps and rubella, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Health, which is now working to combat a growing measles outbreak in the Twin Cities.

More Vaccinated Students Heading Back To Ohio Classrooms

Aug 12, 2015
Needle
Flickr

We’re heading into back to school season, and this year more Ohio students are getting vaccinated. Doctors and public health advocates say new laws are making kids and schools safer, but other warn there’s a battle looming over vaccine requirements and parental rights. 

Advocates To Push Vaccine Legislation At Ohio Statehouse

Mar 10, 2015
ZaldyImg / Flickr

The father of a boy killed by bacterial meningitis and an expert in infectious diseases are among advocates coming to the Ohio Statehouse to promote new vaccine legislation.

The Immunization Advocacy Network of Ohio has organized an event Tuesday to speak to state lawmakers. The organization of immunization providers and supporters says vaccines are valuable to the health of the state.

Flickr

Nearly all incoming freshmen at Ohio State will soon have to be fully vaccinated.

OSU says beginning in the fall, all first-year students who attend at least half-time with one on-campus course will have to be fully vaccinated. OSU says new students will be required to submit proof of vaccinations, and any students who don’t will have a hold placed on their account.

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