university hospitals

Gov. Mike DeWine has said the state will soon require schools to regularly report positive COVID-19 cases to the public.

But the move has local infectious disease experts concerned about patient privacy.

Drs. Amy Ray at MetroHealth and Joan Zoltanski at University Hospitals agree that schools should be transparent about numbers of new cases in order to keep the public informed – but should take care not to give any information that could identify individuals.

University Hospitals (UH) and the NASA Glenn Research Center are partnering to test out two potential methods for decontaminating disposable masks.

Coronavirus cases are on the rise in Ohio and across Northeast Ohio, including in Cleveland. University Hospitals has enough personal protective equipment on hand for now, said UH Innovation Center Managing Director Kipum Lee.

The decontamination methods are a “contingency plan” in case of a future shortage.

If your allergies are worse this season, you might blame it on the coronavirus pandemic.

University Hospitals allergist Dr. Sam Friedlander said it’s possible that allergies are worse now because people stayed home all spring to avoid the virus.

Friedlander said when people have new exposures to allergies, they have a dramatic increase in symptoms.

That means less time outside during the spring while people stayed home could have an impact.

Coronavirus In Ohio: Families Weigh Risks Of Sending Loved Ones To Nursing Homes

May 29, 2020
A sign at the Mill Run nursing home in Hilliard.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

In early March, just as Ohioans were learning about the first cases of novel coronavirus in the state, Anna Bondar’s grandfather fell at his Cleveland home. Luckily, the 92-year old, who lives with dementia, wasn’t injured badly.

The tight-knit family started to discuss the possibility of a nursing home, though they had serious reservations.

The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) announced Wednesday the state has received enough remdesivir from the federal government to treat about 100 patients.

The antiviral drug has shown promise treating COVID-19 patients and received Emergency Use Authorization recently from the Food and Drug Administration.

Gov. Mike DeWine announced Wednesday a partial rollback on his ban on elective medical procedures in Ohio — the same day University Hospitals announced staff pay cuts. Less than 24 hours later, UH also said it plans to shut down some emergency services by the end of the month.

Two hospital systems in Cleveland are offering alternative housing for employees who are working during the COVID-19 pandemic and are concerned about possibly exposing their families to the virus. 

University Hospitals is using a Case Western Reserve University residence hall to temporarily house workers. UH spokesperson George Stamatis said employees at UH Cleveland Medical Center are eligible to stay at the dorm for free for up to four days.

"The lodging is available to all employees of UH Cleveland Medical Center, not only clinical staff," Stamatis said.

University Hospitals is approved to begin clinical trials of an antiviral drug that could possibly help treat COVID-19 patients. UH will receive the antiviral Saturday.

Public health organizations such as the CDC report older individuals are more susceptible to falling seriously ill from COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. But so are those with long-term illnesses, such as people who are living with HIV/AIDS.

"There is a high risk for patients with HIV whose immunity is compromised," said Dr. Elie Saade, Medical Director of Infection Control at University Hospitals. 

Solon resident Jodi Creasap Gee had just relocated to the Cleveland area from Missouri with her husband and three kids when her 5-year-old daughter cut her foot. 

The house was still in disarray and the kids were playing when her daughter came into the kitchen screaming, Creasap Gee said.

“There was just a trail of blood behind her. Her foot’s all bloody and I’m going, ‘oh no.' I don’t even know where to go because we just moved here, and it’s a Sunday,” she said.

Lawyers representing couples affected by a storage freezer malfunction at University Hospitals' fertility clinic filed eight new lawsuits Thursday.  

The suits seek damages from UH and CAS DataLoggers, a company that was responsible for the alarm system involved in the freezer malfunction. The incident caused some 4,000 eggs and embryos to no longer be viable.

Though lawmakers didn’t address the issue after a set of lawsuits against a Cleveland hospital, one outgoing legislator is hoping his bill will move forward after he’s gone.

Nurse Nicole Simpson prepares a flu shot at the Salvation Army in Atlanta on Feb. 7, 2018.
David Goldman / AP

Doctors will have a new drug in their arsenal to help people fight the flu this year. The Food and Drug Administration approved a new medication Wednesday that combats the flu with one dose.

Joe Schiavoni/Twitter

In the wake of a high-profile freezer failure at a fertility clinic, Ohio legislators are considering legislation that would make the state a leader when it comes to regulating how clinics store and handle frozen embryos.