unemployment compensation

Lt. Gov. Jon Husted at the Opportunity Zones Showcase in Columbus, where he unveiled the marketing platform for opportunity zones to share details on places and projects available for investment.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

State officials say they are putting every resource they have into ramping up Ohio's unemployment compensation website, which has been crashing due to the massive influx in requests.

Updated on April 3 at 1:29 p.m. ET

A record 10 million people filed for initial unemployment benefits in the past two weeks, with many more anticipated in coming weeks. All this has put a huge strain on state employment agencies, so experts say persistence is key to getting those benefits.

Updated at 10:13 a.m. ET

New claims for unemployment benefits climbed to 281,000 last week as the coronavirus pandemic shuttered businesses and left people out of work, the Labor Department said Thursday. It was the highest level since Sept. 2, 2017, when they totaled 299,000.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine speaks at his daily COVID-19 press conference at the Ohio Statehouse on Friday, March 13, 2020.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. Mike DeWine has closed all the state's bars and dine-in restaurants until further notice, starting at 9 p.m. Sunday. Restaurants will still be allowed to stay open for carry out and delivery.

Rep. Smith speaks during Ohio House session on April 11, 2018.
Ohio House

The Ohio General Assembly is on summer break after a flurry of activity that included passage of dozens of bills, many sent to the governor, and a few key proposals left in limbo.

Ohio House

The new Ohio House Speaker says now that the seven-week-long fight to elect him is over, it’s time to regain focus on several big issues, chief among them an effort to reform the state’s unemployment compensation fund.

It’s thought that if the state went into a recession now, its unemployment compensation fund wouldn’t be able to pay laid-off workers for more than a few weeks. But there’s still been no progress on a bill that’s touted as a way to fix the fund. These hearings have become routine with many still waiting for action.

Rep. Kirk Schuring talks with a group of reporters
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

The bill to change the way money is put into the fund the state uses to pay benefits to unemployed workers is taking another step forward this week. But it has yet to pick up support from labor or business groups.

There’s about a month left for legislators to get anything done before the new year. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, there’s one issue that the top Senate leader specifically wants to move forward in that time.

Senate President Larry Obhof says it’s time to pass a bill that reforms the state’s unemployment compensation program.

Unemployment Insurance Claims Office sign
Bytemarks / Flickr Creative Commons

Business and labor leaders both agree that something needs to be done to overhaul the fund Ohio uses to pay out jobless benefits. They want to avoid the crisis of 2008 when the state borrowed billions from the feds when the fund dried up.

A new plan has been proposed but both sides seemed to be split on the bill.

Unemployment Insurance Claims Office sign
Bytemarks / Flickr Creative Commons

Talks are continuing on a bill to overhaul the fund set up to pay unemployment benefits to laid off workers.

Shutterstock

There’s been a battle to change what employers pay into - and what benefits workers get out of - the state’s unemployment compensation fund. Now the bill to deal with that seems to be stalled at the Statehouse.

A new committee of lawmakers meets for the first time Thursday to study Ohio’s unemployment compensation system.  Members will see whether the jobless benefits system for workers is sustainable.