unemployment

 This April 22, 2014, file photo shows an employment application form on a table during a job fair at Columbia-Greene Community College in Hudson, N.Y.
Mike Groll / Associated Press

Over 468,000 Ohioans have filed for unemployment in the last two weeks, that’s nearly a third more than the total number filed last year. The coronavirus restrictions have been a huge blow to workers who lost their jobs, and the fallout has created a tremendous strain on the system that’s set up to help them.

Updated at 10:38 a.m. ET

The number of new people claiming unemployment benefits totaled a staggering 6.648 million last week — doubling the record set a week earlier, the Labor Department said Thursday.

In the prior week, ending March 21, a revised 3.307 million initial claims were filed.

In just two weeks, nearly all of the jobs gained in the last five years have been lost.

A job application with a pen.
Flazingo / Flickr

More than 470,000 Ohioans have filed unemployment claims in the last two weeks, according to the Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services.

Unemployment numbers released Thursday were staggering. "A record 3.28 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week as the coronavirus pandemic shut down much of the country," NPR reported.

With very few people booking Airbnbs or taking Uber rides right now, millions of people in the gig economy are seeing their livelihoods abruptly upended.

Take Ed Bell, in San Francisco, who rents out his in-law suite on Airbnb. That is his main source of income — he calls it his "gig" — supplemented by "side hustles" doing consulting work.

Lt. Gov. Jon Husted at the Opportunity Zones Showcase in Columbus, where he unveiled the marketing platform for opportunity zones to share details on places and projects available for investment.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

State officials say they are putting every resource they have into ramping up Ohio's unemployment compensation website, which has been crashing due to the massive influx in requests.

Updated on April 3 at 1:29 p.m. ET

A record 10 million people filed for initial unemployment benefits in the past two weeks, with many more anticipated in coming weeks. All this has put a huge strain on state employment agencies, so experts say persistence is key to getting those benefits.

Updated at 10:51 a.m. ET

A record 3.28 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week as the coronavirus pandemic shut down much of the country. The Labor Department's report for the week ended March 21 was one of the first official indicators of how many people have suddenly been forced out of work nationally.

In the prior report, for the week ended March 14, initial claims totaled 282,000.

Gov. Mike DeWine, center, speaks between Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof, left, and Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder during the Ohio State of the State address at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

In an overwhelming show of bipartisan unity, the Ohio Senate on Wednesday morning unanimously passed a bill making a lot of changes in state law. The Ohio House then joined in a few hours later, approving the bill 91-0, though legislators stress the changes are only temporary. 

Now-Lt. Gov. Jon Husted speaking at the Columbus Chamber of Commerce Government Day in Cincinnati, Ohio on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

The numbers of Ohioans filing for unemployment benefits is rising daily – so quickly, in fact, that the state’s unemployment website was having trouble handling them. Now Ohio is clarifying why it will no longer release the data daily about how many people are filing jobless claims.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine is seen in February in Cleveland.

Now-Lt. Gov. Jon Husted speaking at the Columbus Chamber of Commerce Government Day in Cincinnati, Ohio on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio’s unemployment numbers have been staggering. Claims have skyrocketed close to 140,000 in the first four days of the week as bars, restaurants, salons, movie theaters, and a whole host of other businesses close during the pandemic. 

The U.S. economy has never hit the brakes quite like this before.

While the course of the coronavirus pandemic is unpredictable, forecasters are using their economic models and making some educated guesses about just how bad the damage will be. The forecasts are not pretty:

  • Oxford Economics expects the U.S. economy to shrink at an annual rate of 12% between April and June.
  • JPMorgan Chase sees a second-quarter contraction of 14%.

Unemployment Insurance Claims Office sign
Bytemarks / Flickr Creative Commons

It probably comes as no surprise that unemployment claims in Ohio have skyrocketed this week as businesses continue to temporarily close and lay off workers to try to slow the spread of coronavirus.

Dave Hatfield is a barber and an independent contractor.
Courtesy of Dave Hatfield

Dave Hatfield is a barber, and his wife is a stylist. He says he was hit hard by news that Ohio would close all barbershops, beauty salons, tattoo parlors and spas.

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