travel ban

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

President Trump unveiled controversial legislation on Wednesday that would sharply curtail legal immigration to the United States.

The president met at the White House with two Republican senators pushing the legislation, Tom Cotton of Arkansas and David Perdue of Georgia.

The Supreme Court has upheld parts of a lower court order that had widened the definition of which citizens from the six Muslim-majority countries covered by the Trump administration's travel ban are still eligible to travel to the U.S.

The order issued Wednesday leaves in place the action of a U.S. District Court judge in Hawaii who broadened the definition of close family to include categories such as the grandparents and cousins of a person in the U.S.

The State Department has issued new instructions about which citizens from the six Muslim-majority countries covered by the Trump administration's travel ban are eligible for visas.

The instructions issued to U.S. embassies and consulates widen the definition of a close familial relationship to include categories such as grandparents and cousins, in accordance with a federal court ruling last week, a State Department spokesman said in a statement to The Two-Way.

The U.S. refugee program surpassed the Trump Administration's 50,000-person cap on Wednesday, meaning that many refugees will now be denied entry into the country.

Ruben Castilla Herrera/Twitter

The ACLU of Ohio filed a lawsuit Wednesday against Columbus Police on behalf of three protesters who say they were targeted and pepper sprayed during a January 30 march against President Trump's travel ban.

Shortly before President Trump's travel and refugee ban took partial effect Thursday evening, the state of Hawaii asked a federal court to clarify the scope of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on the president's executive order.

The emergency motion filed in federal court in Honolulu is, in effect, a challenge to the Trump administration's definition of who can be excluded from the U.S.

Updated June 29 at 1:20 p.m. ET

The Trump administration outlined Thursday how it will implement its modified travel ban, following the Supreme Court's decision on Monday lifting a stay on the executive order imposed by two lower courts.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that a preliminary injunction blocking President Trump's travel ban should remain in effect, at least for now. It's the second appeals court decision in less than a month to maintain a nationwide stay on the ban.

What's Next for the ACLU?

Jun 7, 2017
Michael Hanscom / Flickr

The American Civil Liberties Union has a long history of defending individual freedoms — whether the cause is popular or controversial — and even when it puts the ACLU on the same side with organizations they frequently oppose.

 Last week, for example, the ACLU called foul when the Portland mayor canceled a right-wing gathering.   Coming up, the national president of the ACLU talks about their priorities for the next few years. 

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

President Trump's administration filed a petition with the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday night seeking to reverse rulings by lower courts in Hawaii and Maryland that blocked a temporary ban on travel to the United States from six majority-Muslim countries.

The Trump administration says the Constitution gives the president "broad authority to prevent aliens abroad from entering this country when he deems it in the nation's interest."

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that President Trump's controversial travel ban should be kept on hold, maintaining a nationwide preliminary injunction that blocks key elements of the executive order from being enforced.

At a Seattle courtroom on Monday, in the latest battle in the legal war over President Trump's currently suspended travel ban, lawyers and judges pushed and pulled on the swirling questions over Trump's intentions and the legal limits on executive power.

A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments from lawyers for the U.S. government and the state of Hawaii over the executive order that would block travelers from six majority-Muslim countries.

The ACLU of Ohio has joined a nationwide lawsuit to force the release of documents on the implementation of President Trump’s ban on immigration from Muslim-majority countries.

The suit comes after the ACLU filed Freedom of Information requests for the documents in February, just after President Trump's first travel ban was announced. There’s been no response, so now ACLU chapters across the country have filed suits to compel the release of the documents.

President Trump's updated executive order, the one restricting travel from six Muslim-majority countries, is blocked for now.

But administrators at Northeastern University in Boston aren't taking any chances.

"We're in a state of limbo," says Mike Armini, who oversees government relations. "We don't quite know what's going to happen next, so we've advised them to stay here," he says, talking about the 250 Northeastern students from those six countries.

Updated at 10:45 p.m.

President Trump blasted a federal judge's decision to temporarily halt his revised travel ban on Wednesday night, telling a campaign rally in Nashville, Tenn., that he wished he had stood his ground and fought for his original, much stricter executive order.

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