transportation

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

On the west side of Scioto Audubon Metro Park in downtown Columbus, people mount climbing walls, play on beach volleyball courts and ride down bike paths.

highway in Columbus
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

As Memorial Day weekend arrives, many Central Ohioans will be driving to see family and friends. But with driving comes gas, and compared to one month ago, prices are way up.

Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Car-sharing service Car2Go announced in an email to members that “after careful consideration” it will stop operating in Columbus at the end of this month.

Columbus, Ohio skyline
Rfgagel / Wikimedia Commons

Columbus has unveiled a new website to act as a kind of clearing house for important regional data, as part of a larger effort to improve mobility around the city.

DriveOhio, the state's clearinghouse for autonomous vehicle testing and smart technology, plans to include Interstates I-75 between Cincinnati and Dayton and parts of I-275. It's also helping to further Cincinnati's effort to build a test track for driverless shuttles.

Someone cut down a bunch of trees a few months ago at the north and southbound rest areas along I-71 near the Jeremiah Morrow Bridge. The remains lay scattered where they fell. Why were they taken down and why are they still there?

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Provided

Editor's note: This story first ran in April 2018. We are republishing it now because chances are you may see a sign while driving this holiday weekend that reads "Don't Drive Sauced, Leave It To The Cranberries," or "Visiting In-Laws? Slow Down Get There Late." The aim? To make you chuckle, yes, but also to drive safe. 

Glance at an electric overhead highway sign board this weekend in Ohio and you'll likely see an amusing message encouraging you not to text and drive.

"Texting and driving is not 'wreck-amended'" will run in honor of National Distracted Driving Month this April, though it won't be the first time the state's signs have gotten a little clever. 

Amid Hyperloop Hype, Transit Troubles Remain

Apr 6, 2018

Cleveland is studying the possibility of building a high-speed transportation link to Chicago. Supporters say the proposed Hyperloop would open up new jobs to Northeast Ohioans. But some local transit riders and advocates wonder if it’s the best way to spend limited transportation dollars.

Updated at 6:45 p.m. ET

A self-driving car operated by Uber struck and killed a pedestrian who was walking her bicycle in Tempe, Ariz., Sunday night. The incident could be the first pedestrian death involving a self-driving vehicle.

The car was in autonomous mode but had a human riding along to take control of the vehicle if necessary, according to the Tempe Police Department. The victim, 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg, was struck while walking outside a crosswalk, police said. She was immediately transported to a local hospital, where she died.

Esther Honig / WOSU

The Central Ohio Transit Authority has a new leader: Joanna Pinkerton.

Simone Colombai / Flickr

The Columbus City Council has eliminated a cap on taxi licenses, despite a seeming lack of demand.

Could travelers one day climb into pods and zip through vacuum tubes between Cleveland and Chicago at hundreds of miles an hour?

Regional transportation planners will study whether a Hyperloop is feasible here, though the technology hasn’t been fully developed.

It’s not the first time Cleveland has explored an ambitious transportation project. Hyperloop is up against a long history of transit dreams that never came true.

The Cleveland Foundation will pitch in to study whether a Cleveland-to-Chicago Hyperloop route is feasible.

The foundation is giving $200,000 to help with the study by the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency and California-based Hyperloop Transportation Technologies.

Hyperloop Transportation Technologies

The Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency is holding a public meeting Monday on its plans to build a high-tech, high-speed link between Cleveland and Chicago. NOACA plans to fund up to half of a $1.2 million feasibility study for the hyperloop project.

MORPC

Could the Hyperloop pipe dream become a reality? Officials in Columbus and around the region are pitching in money to find out.

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