transportation

Lime electric scooter
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Columbus City Council has sided with Mayor Andrew Ginther in his quest to keep electric scooters off of city sidewalks.

Driverless shuttles debuted in Columbus in December 2018 as part of the Smart Columbus grant.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Driverless vehicles are coming to Columbus.

The green and white self-driving shuttle unveiled by Smart Columbus on Wednesday morning looks something like a small, rectangular minivan. A lot of windows and the logos of partner organizations decorate its sides - Smart Columbus, DriveOhio, May Mobility. 

Google Maps

E. Dublin-Granville Road and Maple Canyon Drive have topped Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission's list of the top 100 High-Crash Intersections in Central Ohio. The rankings not only take into account the number of crashes, but also their severity and the rate of crashes per vehicles that go through.

Bird scooters landed in Cincinnati in July and not everybody is happy about it.

Lime electric scooter
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Mayor Andrew Ginther is introducing regulations to keep electric scooter riders in the street rather than on city sidewalks.

Goodyear christened Wingfoot Three this week, the last in its line of modern airships. 

Over the past year, dockless electric scooters have descended on city sidewalks almost as if they fell from the sky. From Austin, Texas, to Denver to Cambridge, Mass., these compact two-wheelers are leading what researchers are calling the "micro-mobility revolution."

But their arrival has not been without controversy.

A Cincinnati council member said Wednesday any agreement between the city and Bird, the electric scooter company that launched here recently, should include language for the company to cover damages suffered by victims of misuse of the motorized scooters.

Bird is removing its electric scooters from Cleveland today. The company says in a written statement it is “voluntarily pausing our operations” while it works with the city to come to an agreement for ongoing operations of their dockless e-scooters. 

“We have had productive conversations with Councilman Kerry McCormack and community members, and are hopeful that we will be able to collaborate with the City on their permitting process,” according to a Bird spokesperson.

Lime electric scooter
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Go to downtown Columbus or The Ohio State University campus and you’ll see motorized scooters. A lot of scooters.

John Glenn International Airport

John-Glenn Columbus International Airport, Cleveland Hopkins, Akron-Canton and all of Ohio’s commercial airports are at a disadvantage in attracting new airline services. That’s according to the Ohio Aviation Association, which wants the state of Ohio to help change things. 

If you feel like crossing the street is more dangerous today than in years past, you may be right. 

Columbus State student Patrick Simmons uses the new Blindspot app to navigate around the Columbus State campus.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

New navigation technology made possible by the state is helping blind students at Columbus State Community College get around the campus easier.

A new analysis by Case Western Reserve University finds that red light cameras do little to reduce accidents at the intersections where they are installed.

Researchers examined data from Houston over a 12-year period, during which the city ended its red light camera program.

When Adam Stephens walked into his office in Milwaukee one morning in late June, he found messages complaining about the Birds. The deputy city attorney was not amused.

He went for a walk. "Within a couple of minutes, I found one parked on a sidewalk and was able to visually examine it and kind of figure out what it was," Stephens says.

Bird is the name of an electric scooter company. Unannounced, it dropped off somewhere between 70 and 100 rental scooters throughout Milwaukee, where it's illegal to ride motorized scooters in public.

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