transportation

The Transportation Union of America stands in front of a bus stop on North Third Street to protest autonomous buses.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Fully autonomous city buses might be years away, but the coalition People Before Robots is already voicing concerns about safety and jobs.  The statewide group met Thursday night in Linden.

Driverless shuttles debuted in Columbus in December 2018 as part of the Smart Columbus grant.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

On Cleveland Avenue, the a main corridor of the Linden neighborhood, cars and emergency vehicles whiz through at all hours. But many people in Linden don’t have cars.

The I-70/I-71 interchange will be getting a major redo in the coming years.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

It's about to get more expensive to register your vehicle in Columbus.

Updated at 11:06 p.m. ET

Ahead of Uber's initial public offering, drivers for Uber, Lyft and other ride-hailing companies went on strike Wednesday, turning off the apps as they flex their collective muscles to say: What about us?

Drivers in 10 cities across the country took action Wednesday to draw attention to what they say are decreasing wages for drivers and a distressing lack of job security — and some are calling on passengers to temporarily boycott the ride-hailing services, too.

The Ohio State University

Columbus is growing at a rapid rate: By 2050, the city is predicted to have a population of 3 million people. City leaders and others formed a public-private partnership to study how they can best prepare the city for that growth.

You could ride in a flying car as early as 2023 as long as you have the nerve and the money. Uber appears to be leading the pack of about a dozen developers. Research is also happening in Greater Cincinnati. UC students are designing their own model and hope to win $1 million in a competition.

A New Flyer Xcelsior bus seen at the 2008 American Public Transportation Association expo in San Diego, Calif.
The Port Authority / Wikimedia Commons

COTA has begun rolling out more environmentally-friendly New Flyer buses, which feature USB charging ports at every seats and better accomodations for riders with disabilities.

The Smart Columbus Experience Center in downtown Columbus helps promote electric vehicles.
Michael Lee / WOSU

An electric vehicle charging station sits at the corner of City Hall and LeVeque Tower Garage in downtown Columbus. This afternoon, it's empty.

More than 9,000 bike helmets will be handed out for free this year thanks to a safety program called "Put a Lid On It" from ODOT and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Lime electric scooter
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

The Ohio State University is seeking bids from companies that rent shared mobility devices like bikes and scooters.  They’ve put out an RFP, or request for proposals, to lay out what they expect of the vendors hoping to do business on campus.

COTA

Central Ohio Transit Authority will host two public information meetings in the coming week to announce service changes.

Dockless electric scooters are available for rent in dozens of U.S. cities. While the companies behind them are quick to extol their benefits, some health and safety experts are starting to see the challenges that come along for the ride. Scooter companies and city officials say they are aware of the issues, but solutions aren't coming anytime soon.

There are sticking points in the debate over the transportation budget beyond how much to raise the gas tax. One of them is whether the state should impose new rules on communities using traffic cameras.

Ohio House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes (D-Akron)
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, Steve Brown and guest host Ann Fisher discuss how Democrats advocate for their agenda when they are badly outnumbered in state government. Ohio House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes joins the show.

Senators have said they’re going to change the 10.7 cent gas tax increase that the House passed in the transportation budget. Gov. Mike DeWine says that’s too low, and the state needs an 18 cent hike. But one Republican senator has an idea that he says would eliminate the need for a tax increase.

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