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traffic cameras

Ohio Supreme Court chambers.
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

The home rule provision was added to the Ohio constitution by voters in 1912, and the struggles between local officials and state lawmakers have raged almost since then.

A judge has granted the city of Dayton’s request for an injunction, putting on hold some provisions in the recently passed state transportation budget. City officials had sued the state over the provisions reducing local state government funding by every dollar generated by red light camera ticketing programs.

Dayton argued the provisions violate the city’s established right to home rule.

New rules on speed and red-light cameras started this month, as the new transportation budget went into effect. But a community near Cincinnati that suspended its newly-created camera program after those new rules is now facing a lawsuit. 

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is vowing to fight a provision in the new two-year state transportation budget that would penalize cities for the use of red-light traffic cameras. Republican Gov. Mike DeWine Wednesday signed the bill, which also raises Ohio’s gas tax to fund road and bridge infrastructure repairs.

The transportation budget requires cities that operate red-light cameras to report any fines the cameras generate, and for the state to deduct that income from their state aid allocations.

The city reported roughly $1.9 million in revenue from its camera program 2018.

There are sticking points in the debate over the transportation budget beyond how much to raise the gas tax. One of them is whether the state should impose new rules on communities using traffic cameras.

In this Dec. 16, 2014, file photo, a truck passes a red light photo enforcement sign that is placed below a red light camera at the intersection of Route 1 and Franklin Corner Road in Lawrence Township, N.J.
Mel Evans / Associated Press

It’s been a few years, but state lawmakers are trying again to put rules on local traffic cameras, which they’ve said communities use to generate revenue rather than improve safety. The new regulations are part of the same budget that would raise the state’s gas tax.

Ohio Supreme Court chambers.
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

It was a big year for the Ohio Supreme Court, with decisions on abortion, the death penalty and bobbleheads and the final blow to what had been the state’s largest online charter school. These and others  decisions from the court were some of the stories that made headlines in 2018. 

Franklin Township Police Officer Jeff Francies on traffic duty.
Nick Evans / WOSU

It’s early afternoon, and Franklin Township Police Officer Jeff Francies is on traffic duty. Taking up a spot in a driveway along Clime Road, he explains how the township’s new speed camera works.

Motorists drive past a sign warning of upcoming traffic cameras in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / AP

The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled four times previously that cities have the right to operate traffic cameras. Now the court is deciding whether a lower court can block a plan to cut state funding to certain communities who use those cameras.

Motorists drive past a sign warning of upcoming traffic cameras in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / AP

A bill halfway through the legislature would allow the state to deduct the amount cities take in from traffic cameras from their state funding. Even though only about a dozen or so communities in Ohio are using cameras, cities are fighting the proposal.

Red light camera in Springfield, Ohio.
Derek Jensen / Wikimedia Commons

A two-year old state law that sets rules on traffic cameras went before the Ohio Supreme Court Tuesday in a case filed by cities who claim the law amounts to a ban and a violation of "home rule."

Ohio County Judge Blocks New State Rules On Traffic Cameras

Apr 3, 2015
wiki commons

A southwest Ohio judge has ruled new restrictions on traffic cameras violate the state’s constitution, granting the city of Dayton a permanent order blocking them.

Montgomery County Common Pleas Judge Barbara Gorman says rules such as requiring police officers to be present when cameras are used violate the Ohio municipalities’ “home rule” powers.

She says the law passed late last year tells local governments how to allocate their law enforcement personnel.

Flickr

Columbus city leaders say they will file a lawsuit to repeal a new state law that effectively bans red light cameras.