tobacco

In 40 years of smoking, Katie Kennedy has tried four times to quit but always went back to cigarettes. Today, she is summoning a new mental image when a craving comes on: rows of COVID-19 patients hooked to ventilators.

Kennedy's dad also smoked. He was on a ventilator before he died, and seeing how invasive the machine was, and watching his discomfort and distress, made Kennedy vow not to die like that.

Lindsay Fox / Wikimedia Commons

The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (TCA) passed in 2009 requires the FDA to include new warning labels on cigarette packages. But in 2012, the agency’s attempt to add the labels was thwarted by a lawsuit from cigarette companies, who said the requirements violated First Amendment rights.

Efforts to stem the tide of teen vaping seem to be a step behind the market. By the time Juul pulled most of its flavored pods from the market in October of 2019, many teens had already moved on to an array of newer, disposable vape products.

The federal government recently raised the smoking age to 21 to help curb teen vaping.  Some are applauding the decision as a win for public health. Others worry it was a knee-jerk reaction.

Just a few weeks ago, some Midwest state legislatures were aiming to raise the legal age for smoking. But Congress moved first, setting a new national age limit of 21. Now, some anti-smoking advocates say that’s not enough. 

A New Way To Help Black Smokers Quit

Jan 14, 2020

Jan Johnson smoked a dozen cigarettes a day for about two decades.

"I would go to bingo at least four times out of a week, and at bingo it was just the thing to do," she said.

When her apartment building went smoke free in 2018, she knew something would have to change. 

She saw a bulletin board for a research study testing whether a text messaging program could help people stop smoking and decided to sign up.

The number of vaping deaths have climbed over 50 as the outbreak of lung injury cases have topped 2,500 nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

While the number of hospitalizations slowed in recent weeks, the latest figures released on Thursday show that most people who have had lung injuries after vaping had consumed THC-containing products.

The Trump administration's plan to ban most flavored vaping products has stalled out, at least for the moment.

Two months ago, President Trump announced he was pursuing the new policy to put a dent in the youth vaping epidemic. The plan was supposed to have been unveiled in a matter of weeks.

But industry pushback and the politics of vaping appear to have derailed that process.

A rally in support of flavored vapor products was held at the Ohio Statehouse on Tuesday, October 1, 2019.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the state's efforts to regulate the vaping industry after a string of vaping-related injuries and deaths. James Jarvis, president of the Ohio Vapor Trade Association, joins the show. 

picjumbo / Pixabay

A national report ranks Ohio in the bottom half in the country for the health of women, infants and children.

The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) is confirming three reports of severe pulmonary illness are likely caused by vaping and it is investigating 11 more suspected cases. That's up from six suspected cases the agency reported less than two weeks ago.

e-cigarette
Lindsay Fox / Pixabay

A new service launched by the Ohio Department of Health this month offers free, confidential help for people under 18 who are trying to stop using e-cigarettes and tobacco – something that the U.S. Surgeon General calls an “epidemic.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., says one of his "highest priorities" is to take on the leading cause of preventable death in the United States: smoking.

McConnell has sponsored a bill, along with Virginia Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine, that would increase the tobacco purchase age from 18 to 21.

Updated at 3:04 p.m. ET

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced he will introduce national legislation to raise the minimum age for people buying tobacco products from 18 to 21. Some anti-tobacco advocates worry that the plan could actually harm children by heading off other regulation efforts.

A public health advocate is pleased Summit County has now banned businesses from selling tobacco products to anyone younger than 21 years old. The legislation, known as Tobacco 21, lessens the chance for teens to get their hands on popular e-cigarettes, Juuls and other paraphernalia.

The director of population health at Summit County Public Health Cory Kendrick said the use of these products among middle and high school students has resulted in the highest rates of  teen tobacco use in years.

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