teacher unions | WOSU Radio

teacher unions

CEA President John Coneglio addressing union members ahead of Tuesday's school board meeting.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Across the street from Tuesday night’s Columbus City School Board meeting, union members gathered to protest the board’s plan to hire an alternative staffing firm amid contract talks. Chanting slogans, they urged the board to use the money for librarians, nurses and school psychologists.

Marchers making their way across the Main Street Bridge. Columbus teachers are protesting tax abatements as their union negotiates a new contract.
Nick Evans / WOSU

The Columbus Board of Education is expected to vote Tuesday on a contingency plan for a possible teacher strike.

Columbus City Schools District Office.
Nick Evans / WOSU

The Columbus Board of Education is taking steps to prepare for a possible teachers’ strike this summer.

Marchers making their way across the Main Street Bridge. Columbus teachers are protesting tax abatements as their union negotiates a new contract.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Some held signs, most chanted, but Marisa Keith pushed a cart.

“This is my art cart,” she explains. “I wanted everybody to see that this is my classroom.”

Columbus Education Association president John Coneglio marches with hundreds of teachers in downtown Columbus on April 24, 2019.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Hundreds of teachers and their supporters streamed through downtown Columbus on Wednesday demanding lower class sizes, higher pay and an end to tax incentives for local developers.

Ohio Higher Education officials will review the results a faculty no-confidence vote against Wright State’s Board of Trustees. On Monday, members of Wright State’s faculty approved the no-confidence action by a wide margin. The vote is an appeal for assistance by the faculty to the governor’s office.

More than half of Wright State’s faculty members weighed in, with 87 percent voting no confidence in the Board of Trustees.

No-confidence votes are largely symbolic, according to Sean McKinniss, a researcher who specializes in university governance.

Wright State University’s faculty union has launched a GoFundMe page to raise money. Organizers say any donations raised during the fundraising campaign will reimburse union members for pay they lost during Wright State’s recent strike. The so-called AAUP-WSU Strike Fund has a goal of raising $500,000.

The current wave of teacher walkouts started a year ago this week, when educators across West Virginia were out of the classroom for nine days. The movement spread to five more states before the school year was over.

Wright State’s Board of Trustees unanimously approved a tentative agreement with the faculty union at a meeting last night, bringing more than two years of contract negotiations to a close.

The board greenlighted two separate contracts that will run consecutively until June of 2023.

Wright State University

After 20 days, the faculty union strike at Wright State University has ended.

With the help of a federal mediator, union and administration negotiators reached a tentative agreement late Sunday night.

Governor Mike DeWine says his administration has no plans to intervene in the Wright State faculty strike. The strike is in its sixteenth day and no contract negotiations are scheduled. This week, the university authorized the hiring of longterm substitutes to replace striking faculty.

In a statement, Wright State officials say any replacement instructors who fill in during the strike would be temporary, qualified and asked to commit to teaching the rest of the semester.

Wright State University’s faculty union resumed picketing this week after weekend negotiations failed to reach a deal. The strike has so far lasted more than two weeks with no word yet on when contract negotiations could resume.  

Despite reassurances from Wright State administration officials, who maintain they're working to minimize disruptions on campus, many Wright State students are reporting frustration over disruptions to their classes.

The Wright State faculty union strike is in its fourteenth day. And while negotiations resumed over the weekend between the administration and the union, no agreement was reached.

So, Monday afternoon union members returned to the picket lines, joined by dozens of students and community members.

The picket line stretched for almost an entire block near the entrance to Wright State’s Fairborn campus. 

Lining the curb were more than 100 people cheering in support of striking faculty members.

Negotiations resumed Friday between the Wright State University administration and the faculty union, 11 days after the faculty strike began.

The walkout has now gone on longer than all but one higher-education strikes last year.

William Herbert, director of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education, says that while most strikes are typically resolved within a week it’s not unheard of for them to last longer.

Wright State University’s faculty union strike could affect the school’s credit rating if it continues much longer, according to an analyst for Moody’s Investor Services. A lower credit rating could make it more difficult for Wright State to take out loans.

Only two years ago, Moody’s lowered Wright State’s credit rating three notches from A2 to Baa2. At the time, analysts said the school’s, “severe financial deterioration in a short period of time," led to the downgrade.

Pages