Syria

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Former U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich is returning a $20,000 speaking fee he received last year from a group sympathetic to Syrian President Bashar Assad.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

O.K., Ohio gubernatorial candidate Dennis Kucinich, you may have your hands full explaining this to Democratic primary voters.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Apr 23, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Gubernatorial candidate Dennis Kucinich is facing staunch criticism for accepting payments for speeches he had delivered to sympathizers of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Kucinich has refused to condemn Assad for allegedly launching chemical attacks against his own people, and has criticized American missile strikes on Syrian military bases.

We'll also look at the GOP race for governor, payday lending, and more with our panel of reporters.

Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Former Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland denounced Democratic gubernatorial candidate Dennis Kucinich for accepting $20,000 to give a speech to a group that supports Syrian president Bashar Assad. 

Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Former U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich, a candidate for Ohio governor, reported Tuesday earning speaking fees from a group with sympathies toward the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Political Junkie Ken Rudin

Apr 10, 2018
L Alleb Brewer / Flickr

President Trump has condemned the suspected chemical weapons attack that killed several people in Syria, calling it a "barbaric act." He has said that he will make a decision about a potential military response within the next two days. Russia and Syria have denied any responsibility for the attack. 

We'll also look at the Mueller investigation, a potential trade war with China, and more with the Political Junkie, Ken Rudin.

Fig and pomegranate trees, grapes, carrots, and narcissus flowers are some of the plants that Aveen Ismail likes to grow in the Domiz refugee camp in Northern Iraq where she lives. That's because these plants remind her of Syria and home.

At first, Ismail did not find the dry land welcoming. But she values greenery and gardening, so she cultivated a small patch of land next to the house her family built in the camp.

An estimated 300 Americans attempted to join the Islamic State and other radical Islamist groups in Iraq and Syria, including a small number who rose to senior positions, according to the most detailed report to date on this issue.

So far, 12 of those Americans have returned home, yet none has carried out an attack on U.S. soil, according the report released Monday by George Washington University's Program on Extremism.

In 2012, as Syria's internal unrest deepened into full-scale civil war, Syrians living in the U.S. were offered an opportunity: If they met certain conditions and paid the requisite fees, they could register for temporary protection from deportation — and avoid having to return to the violence that awaited them back home.

In 2003, Adam Davidson and Jen Banbury were living in Baghdad, working as reporters covering the Iraq War. And they were falling in love.

They went on vacation to Aleppo. This was before the city became the symbol of the devastation of the Syrian civil war, back when you might actually go there on vacation.

A friend put them in touch with a local photographer named Issa Touma. And Issa said, "While you're here, you have to go to this sandwich shop."

Eman Altaani cracks fresh pepper into a pot of sizzling ground beef and onions, surrounded by a group of students. Most have never tasted Syrian food, let alone cooked it.

U.S.-backed forces have surrounded the northern Syrian city of Raqqa, the Islamic State group's so-called capital, dealing a symbolic blow to the extremist group as it continues to lose territory.

However, human rights advocates are sounding the alarm about civilians still inside the besieged city, which ISIS seized in 2014.

U.N. human rights chief Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said Wednesday that "up to 100,000 civilians are effectively trapped as the air and ground offensive intensifies."

An airstrike that was meant to target ISIS in Syria instead killed 18 Syrian Democratic Forces personnel because it was "misdirected," U.S. Central Command said Thursday.

The strike Tuesday by an aircraft from the U.S.-led coalition was called in by American allies, the U.S. military says. It adds that the coalition is now studying what went wrong to prevent similar mistakes in the future.

White House officials say the U.S. intelligence community is confident that Syrian President Bashar Assad attacked his own people with chemical weapons on April 4 — and that an alternative explanation offered by Russia is an effort to deflect blame and "confuse the world community."

Senior administration officials "suggested that the attack may have been motivated by rebel gains in the surrounding area, as rebel forces approached a strategic Syrian air base," NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

U.S. Missile Strike on Syria

Apr 11, 2017
President Donald Trump recieving a briefing about the Syrian chemical attack at Mar-a-Lago in West Palm Beach.
Shealah Craighead / The White House

President Donald Trump ordered a missile strike on Syria late last week in response to a chemical attack carried out against Syrian citizens. The move received mixed reactions from foreign policy analysts and government officials, and some fear the strike could have deeply damaged U.S. and Russian relations. Join us today as we discuss the consequences of this strike and what future U.S. policy regarding Syria might look like.

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