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Updated on June 7 at 4:30 p.m. ET

The way Thomas Hofeller talked about redistricting — the drawing of political boundaries and the sifting of voters into buckets — you could be forgiven if you assumed he was speaking about a loved one or a favorite holiday.

A man watches a baseball game in a casino.
John Locher / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss what legalized sports gambling will look like in Ohio. Brent Johnson, a reporter who covers the New Jersey Statehouse for the Star Ledger and NJ.com, joins the show.

Updated at 10:53 p.m. ET

A major Republican redistricting strategist played a role in the Trump administration's push to get a citizenship question on forms for the 2020 census.

David Niven, a professor of political science at the University of Cincinnati holds a map demonstrating a gerrymandered Ohio district, Thursday, April 11, 2019, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

The group that sued over Ohio’s Congressional district map says there’s still time to draw a new one for next year's election if lawmakers are ordered to do that, even though the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday delayed a lower court’s order to do so by June 14.

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

The Supreme Court is leaving in place part of an Indiana law that mandates that aborted fetuses be buried or cremated.

The court did not take up a second part of the law that banned abortions because of fetal abnormality, the fetus's race, sex or ancestry. A lower court struck down that part of the law in addition to the burial provision. The Supreme Court, though, said it will wait for other lower court rulings before weighing in on the fetal characteristics provision.

U.S. Supreme Court
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Ohio does not need to immediately draw a new congressional map, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday.

Abortion supporters gather outside the Ohio Statehouse on Tuesday to rally against the anti-abortion laws in the state.
SAM ABERLE / Ohio Public Radio

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown examine the backlash against the strict abortion bans passing in Ohio and states across the county. Jo Ingles, statehouse reporter for Ohio Public Radio and Television, joins the show.

The recent passage of the so-called "Heartbeat Bill" has caused some confusion about the legality of abortion in Ohio. Gov. MIke DeWine signed the legislation into law last month, but it does not take effect until July. The ACLU and other organizations have sued, hoping to prevent the law from going into effect. Morning Edition host Amy Eddings spoke with Be Well Health reporter Marlene Harris-Taylor about the current realities of abortion access in Ohio.

Let's start with the facts about this new law. How does it does it work?

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Native American rights in a 5-4 decision in a case out of Wyoming. Justice Neil Gorsuch, the only Westerner on the court, provided the decisive vote in this case, showing himself again to be sensitive to Native American rights.

The bitter battle over the death penalty continued Monday at the U.S. Supreme Court with the highly unusual release of explanatory statements from the court's conservatives as to why they reached such apparently contradictory decisions in two death cases in February and March.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that a major antitrust lawsuit against Apple over its App Store can move forward. The 5-to-4 ruling immediately plunged Apple's stock prices and opened the door to the possibility of enormous future damages against the company.

Justice Brett Kavanaugh, appointed by President Trump last year, wrote the decision for himself and the court's four liberal justices. In it, he stressed that the court majority was taking no position on the merits of the lawsuit but said that under long-standing precedent the suit could proceed to its next stages.

Dan Keck / Flickr

The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to hear an appeal involving Upper Arlington and a local Christian school trying to move into a building zoned for commercial use.

A federal court has denied Ohio’s request to delay new congressional map drawing. The request was filed after the court ruled that the current district lines are gerrymandered to benefit Republicans. The state says it’s still looking to the U.S. Supreme Court to stay the decision pending its appeal. But a top Ohio Democrat says now is the time for the state to get the ball rolling on drawing the new congressional districts. 

Dave Yost speaks at the Ohio Republican Party event, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. Yost was elected as the next Ohio attorney general.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

The panel of three federal judges that ruled Ohio's Congressional map unconstitutional has denied a request to delay their order to draw a new map by June 14.

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday on a citizenship question proposed for the 2020 census.

The court's ruling could affect Ohio in several ways. 

The state is expected to lose a congressional seat and an electoral vote after the 2020 Census, due to population declines. Those seats are apportioned on the basis of all residents in a state, not just citizens.

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