storycorps

Toni Shorter Smith and her mother-in-law Reita Bynum Smith.
storycorps / wosu

Preserving African American history has many challenges. That's why many saw it as a victory when two buildings from Poindexter Village were saved from demolition. The two buildings on Columbus’s Near East Side are being preserved as a museum exploring one of the nation’s first public housing programs and the tight-knit community it created.

Rick Hodges and Jim Obergefell
storycorps / WOSU

The landmark 2015 U.S. Supreme Court decision on "Obergefell v. Hodges" legalized same-sex marriage. In the case, Cincinnati real estate broker Jim Obergefell sued the state of Ohio for refusing to recognize his marriage to his husband John Arthur on Arthur’s death certificate after he died from ALS.

Ernie Hartong and his daughter Erin Sogal.
StoryCorps COLUMBUS / WOSU

Ernie Hartong enlisted in the army during the Vietnam War. Today, he volunteers at Columbus’s National Veteran’s Memorial and Museum.

Ernie sat down with his daughter Erin Sogal to reflect on his service, how soldiers stayed in touch with loved ones at home, and how he works to communicate his experience to young people.

photo of  John and Jane Byrnes
storycorp

Katie Byrnes was born deaf, but this didn’t stop her from finding ways to relate to others.

Her parents, Jayne and John Byrnes remember Katie’s earliest signs of communicating, her intelligence and love of music. Even though Katie passed at the young age of five-years-old, she had an incredible impact on the deaf community.

WOSU

StoryCorps COLUMBUS is the new podcast and radio series from WOSU Public Media.

Roxanne and Dennis Simmonds knew their son as fearless and strong from the day he was born.

"D.J. came out with shoulders of a linebacker," Roxanne says. "He was the first baby I saw that had muscles."

"He wasn't really afraid of anything," Dennis says.

At night, young D.J. would take the dog with him and circle the entire house, to "make sure there's nobody on the grounds," Dennis says, laughing. "I used to say, 'D.J. where you going? It's late.' He would say 'I'm doing a perimeter search, Dad.' "

Rickey Jackson spent nearly four decades in prison for a crime he didn't commit.

In May of 1975, when a shopkeeper at a small Cleveland grocery store was slain during a robbery, Eddie Vernon, then 12 years old, served as the main witness in the case. Eddie — who, in fact, hadn't seen anything — says he was pressured into testifying by police.

With enough divisive topics to go around the Thanksgiving table this year, dinner debates can easily steal our attention away from loved ones. StoryCorps suggests using its app to have a meaningful, one-on-one conversation, as part of its Great Thanksgiving Listen project, where kids interview their elders about their lives. But anyone with a smartphone can participate.

When Adam Shay overdosed on heroin at 21 in 2014, his kidney and pancreas went to Karen Goodwin, a recovering addict herself. That unintended consequence of the opioid epidemic brought Goodwin together with Adam's mom, Marlene Shay.

At StoryCorps in Beachwood, Ohio, Shay recalls the day she got the call that every mother dreads.

Adam "had been in and out of rehab over the last three years, but he had been sober for a year and seemingly had it all together," she says. "And that day, we got a call from his fiancée that he overdosed and was slipping away."

Sometimes the toughest interview questions come from the most surprising places. Nine-year-old Isaiah Fredericks and his 7-year-old brother, Josiah, put their dad, Kevin, in the interview hot seat during a visit to StoryCorps.

They started out with the basics: when and where Kevin was born.

"I was born in El Paso, Texas, in 1983 on my grandmother Ruthie's bed," Kevin said.

Isaiah didn't know this but admitted it was an interesting piece of information.

But then his brother, Josiah, asked their dad, "How do you describe yourself as a child? Were you happy?"

Michael Ryan, 45, is a juvenile judge in Cleveland, Ohio. And like many of the kids who end up in his courtroom, he didn't have an easy childhood.

He adored his mother, he tells his son — also named Michael, 19, at StoryCorps in Cleveland, but she was addicted to heroin.

Looking for a diversion from divisive political conversation this Thanksgiving? StoryCorps suggests using its smartphone app as part of its Great Thanksgiving Listen project.

Ties that Bind: Ten Years of StoryCorps

Nov 4, 2013

11:00 In the last ten years of StoryCorps, founder Dave Isay has heard hundreds of people open up about deeply personal topics. He now has a new book out that honors the bonds between us--friends, family, neighbors and strangers. This hour we'll talk to him about some of the most memorable recordings that are testament to the power of listening. Guests:

A Mother's Day Tribute with Dave Isay

May 9, 2013

10:00 Ten years ago, radio producer Dave Isay set up an audio recording booth in New York's Grand Central Station. Since then, over 90,000 people have participated in his national oral history project called StoryCorps.  This hour, listeners to NPR will recognize Isay's voice, and the tears rolling down their cheeks as we talk to him about his favorite interviews featuring moms.

 Guests

Love Stories from StoryCorps

Feb 13, 2012

11:00 StoryCorps collects and preserves the stories of our lives. They have complied a new set of stories... Join us on this hour of "All Sides" as we get mushy and talk about stories of love. Do you have a great story? Call in on this hour and tell us! Guest

  • Dave Isay (Founder & President, StoryCorps)

Book Click here for more information on Isay's "All There Is: Love Stories from StoryCorps."

Pages