Steve Chabot

In this Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020, file photo, Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, R-Ohio, speaks during a Senate Commerce subcommittee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, on intercollegiate athlete compensation.
Susan Walsh / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the part Ohio's congressional delegation played in the impeachment of President Trump.

A week ago, in the aftermath of a violent, destructive and deadly rampage of the U.S. Capitol by a mob of Trump supporters – a rampage that could have been much worse – we were inundated by tweets and press releases from Republicans in the Ohio congressional delegation decrying what had happened in their workplace, the very center of American democracy.

But barely a word about who inspired a frenzied mob of thugs to scale the walls and cause chaos in the halls of Congress – the president of the United States, Donald J. Trump.

Heading into Wednesday's joint session of Congress to tally the Electoral College vote results, lawmakers anticipated a long day peppered with objections hinged on baseless allegations of election fraud. More than a dozen Republican senators had said they would object to at least one state's election results.

Despite some polls suggesting otherwise, incumbent Republican Rep. Steve Chabot was able to fight off a challenge from Democrat Kate Schroder Tuesday night with an amount that was larger than polls projected but smaller than the last time Chabot faced a tough competitor in 2018.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Incumbents have held onto their seats in all 16 U.S. House races this year, as Republicans maintain their 12-4 advantage within Ohio's congressional delegation.

Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley speaks to members of the media Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District after a mass shooting that occurred early Sunday morning in Dayton
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio Democrats are trying to stir up support for a future challenger against U.S. Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio), whose vote for new U.S. Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett sparked an online fundraiser.

With seven weeks minus one day to go, Democratic first-time candidate Kate Schroder seems poised to climb to the summit of one of the steepest hills in Southwest Ohio politics – taking down long-time GOP congressman Steve Chabot.

If Democrat Kate Schroder – a first time candidate for anything – pulls off an upset win over Republican incumbent Steve Chabot in Ohio's 1st Congressional District in November, there will be some better-known Democratic politicians in Cincinnati who are going to be deeply depressed.

Kate Schroder of Clifton easily defeated Nikki Foster of Warren County in Ohio's 1st Congressional District, setting up a general election race against Republican incumbent Steve Chabot, who has held the seat for the better part of a  quarter century.

If your state has congressional districts that are such a jumbled, gerrymandered mess that they have nicknames like "The Snake on the Lake" and "The Duck," then you have a problem. You also live in Ohio.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh meets Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 11, 2018.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press

Most of Ohio’s Republican Congressional delegation has signed a letter urging the U.S. Supreme Court to reconsider, and possibly overturn, the landmark abortion decision "Roe v. Wade."

Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, speaks during a campaign event at Price Hill Chili, Monday, Sept. 17, 2018, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio’s Secretary of State is changing rules for the way political candidates designate their campaign treasurers on forms filed with his office, following an incident with the campaign of Rep. Steve Chabot (R-Ohio).

U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot apparently believes the Federal Elections Commission's finding that $123,625 has come up missing from his campaign fund is not going to hurt his campaign for re-election and that a "thorough audit" will clear things up.

There are only two explanations for him believing this:

After 'Send Her Back!' Chant, Cincinnati Rally A Test For Trump

Aug 1, 2019
President Donald Trump speaks during the 2018 Ohio Republican Party State Dinner, Friday, Aug. 24, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio.
John Minchillo / AP

President Donald Trump's latest rally will be a test for both candidate and crowd.

Youngstown-area U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan takes a selfie with a delegate at the 2016 Democratic Party Convention.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

We're still almost two years away from the time when the numbers geeks hired by the political parties in Ohio put on their green eyeshades and load their U.S. Census data into their computers and begin turning out a brand-new congressional district map.

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