State of the Union

President Donald Trump speaks in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020, in Washington, following his acquittal by the U.S. Senate..
Evan Vucci / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown review a week jam-packed with political drama, from the disastrous caucus in Iowa to the President's victory lap after his acquittal by the Senate.

Kurt Pyle, political science professor at Kenyon College, joins the show.

President Trump took full advantage of the large television audience for his State of the Union speech on Tuesday to make his case for reelection in November, touting the strong economy and delighting Republicans in the room with a series of made-for-TV moments.

State Of The Union Reaction

Feb 5, 2020
President Donald Trump
Wikipedia

President Trump delivered his third “State Of The Union” address on Tuesday night, ahead of his likely acquittal on impeachment charges by the U.S. Senate.

Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump is delivering the 2020 "State of the Union" address, which comes under the shadow of his impeachment trial. Watch his remarks live and follow a live annotation of his remarks, including fact checks and analysis from NPR reporters.

When President Trump stands before Congress on Tuesday to deliver his State of the Union address, he will be a president impeached, but not yet acquitted.

Traditionally, the State of the Union address is the most important and most-watched speech of the year for a president. Doing it in the midst of an impeachment trial adds another political dimension.

President Clinton faced a similar situation in 1999. He delivered his State of the Union on the very day his legal team began presenting his impeachment defense to senators.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

President Trump is set to deliver his third State of the Union address Tuesday night, less than a day before the U.S. Senate is scheduled to vote on two articles of impeachment against him.

While the scene on Capitol Hill has been tumultuous during the impeachment trial, a senior administration official told reporters last week that Trump's address would use "the great American comeback" as its theme and take an optimistic tone.

Here's what you need to know ahead of tonight's address.

Updated at 2:19 p.m. ET

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has officially invited President Trump to deliver his annual State of the Union address on Feb. 4.

"In their great wisdom, our Founders crafted a Constitution based on a system of separation of powers: three co-equal branches acting as checks on each other. To ensure that balance of powers, the Constitution calls for the President to 'from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union,' " Pelosi writes.

Jarun Ontakrai / Shutterstock

President Trump announced a new plan to end the HIV epidemic in America by 2030 in his State of the Union address Tuesday. Ohio is one major target of the initiative.

President Trump delivered a wide-ranging State of the Union address Tuesday night that went an hour and 21 minutes. That's the third-longest ever.

So what should we make of Trump's third address to Congress, and in a year when Democrats are gearing up for a crowded primary to decide who will face Trump in 2020?

1. Trump did not acknowledge the new political reality in Washington

Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

President Trump is delivering a "State of the Union" address Tuesday after a delay due to the government shutdown. Watch his speech live, followed by a Democratic response delivered by former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams. 

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

President Trump will deliver his second State of the Union address to Congress on Tuesday night. He's expected to deliver a bipartisan message themed around "choosing greatness," while outlining what the White House calls a "policy agenda both parties can rally behind."

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Youngstown Mayor Jamael Tito Brown, a Democrat, is heading to Washington for the “State of the Union” address Tuesday night as the guest of Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio). 

To give the customary response to the presidential State of the Union address Tuesday night, Democratic congressional leaders selected a not-so-customary person.

Normally, the opposition party chooses someone well-known for their time in Congress or statewide office. But this year, Democrats turned to Stacey Abrams, who lost the governor's race in Georgia last fall.

With the government reopened — at least for now — following a 35-day partial government shutdown, President Trump's State of the Union address has been rescheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 5.

In a letter sent to the president on Monday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., wrote that the two had agreed upon the new date next week, after she had postponed her original offer of Jan. 29 amid the shutdown.

Updated at 1:15 a.m. ET

President Trump said Wednesday night he won't be looking for an alternative place to give the State of the Union address. Earlier in the day, asked about House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., insisting he could not speak on the House floor until a partial government shutdown is over, the president said, "We'll do something in the alternative."

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