State of the Union | WOSU Radio

State of the Union

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President Trump announced a new plan to end the HIV epidemic in America by 2030 in his State of the Union address Tuesday. Ohio is one major target of the initiative.

President Trump delivered a wide-ranging State of the Union address Tuesday night that went an hour and 21 minutes. That's the third-longest ever.

So what should we make of Trump's third address to Congress, and in a year when Democrats are gearing up for a crowded primary to decide who will face Trump in 2020?

1. Trump did not acknowledge the new political reality in Washington

Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

President Trump is delivering a "State of the Union" address Tuesday after a delay due to the government shutdown. Watch his speech live, followed by a Democratic response delivered by former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams. 

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

President Trump will deliver his second State of the Union address to Congress on Tuesday night. He's expected to deliver a bipartisan message themed around "choosing greatness," while outlining what the White House calls a "policy agenda both parties can rally behind."

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Youngstown Mayor Jamael Tito Brown, a Democrat, is heading to Washington for the “State of the Union” address Tuesday night as the guest of Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio). 

To give the customary response to the presidential State of the Union address Tuesday night, Democratic congressional leaders selected a not-so-customary person.

Normally, the opposition party chooses someone well-known for their time in Congress or statewide office. But this year, Democrats turned to Stacey Abrams, who lost the governor's race in Georgia last fall.

With the government reopened — at least for now — following a 35-day partial government shutdown, President Trump's State of the Union address has been rescheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 5.

In a letter sent to the president on Monday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., wrote that the two had agreed upon the new date next week, after she had postponed her original offer of Jan. 29 amid the shutdown.

Updated at 1:15 a.m. ET

President Trump said Wednesday night he won't be looking for an alternative place to give the State of the Union address. Earlier in the day, asked about House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., insisting he could not speak on the House floor until a partial government shutdown is over, the president said, "We'll do something in the alternative."

Updated at 6:57 p.m. ET

President Trump appears to be retaliating against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for suggesting he postpone his State of the Union address amid the ongoing partial government shutdown by postponing at the last minute her planned trip to Afghanistan.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

The annual State of the Union message to Congress may be the latest casualty of the partial government shutdown.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., sent a letter to President Trump on Wednesday, suggesting a postponement until after the shutdown is over. The speech, which the president would deliver to a joint session of Congress and a national broadcast audience, was originally scheduled for Jan. 29.

President Trump delivered one of the longest State of the Union speeches in history.

Clocking in at one hour and 20 minutes, it was the third longest, behind two from President Bill Clinton in 2000 and 1995.

If you missed the speech, we promise to catch you up in far less time than that (so, you're welcome).

Here are eight key moments and themes:

1. Not much new policy

President Trump's State of the Union

Jan 31, 2018
Army Sgt. Amber I. Smith / Joint Chiefs of Staff

Last night, President Trump gave his first State of the Union address. We'll take a look at what the administration has accomplished in its first year and the President's vision for the future. 

Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

President Trump is delivering his State of the Union address to Congress, which will be followed by a response from the Democratic Party. Journalists across the NPR newsroom will be annotating those remarks, adding fact-checks and analysis in real time. You can also watch the speeches live, courtesy of PBS NewsHour.

Sherrod Brown

Sen. Sherrod Brown hopes to draw attention at tonight’s State of the Union address to a bill that would restore pension plans for a million members that are running out of money. 

Liam James Doyle / NPR

President Trump is delivering his State of the Union address to Congress, which will be followed by a response from the Democratic Party. Journalists across the NPR newsroom will be annotating those remarks, adding fact-checks and analysis in real time. You can also watch the speeches live, courtesy of PBS NewsHour.

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