social media

Tech Tuesday: TikTok's Uncertain Future

6 hours ago
TikTok on a phone
Solen Feyissa / Flickr

TikTok, the widely popular video-sharing app, faces an uncertain future after President Trump signed an executive order that would restrict transactions in the U.S. after 45 days.

TikTok is planning to sue the Trump administration, challenging the president's executive order banning the service from the United States.

Updated 10:55 a.m. ET Friday

President Trump on Thursday invoked his emergency economic powers to impose broad sanctions against TikTok, a move that steps up pressure on the Chinese-owned app to sell its U.S. assets to an American company.

In the order, which takes effect in 45 days, any transactions between TikTok's parent company, ByteDance, and U.S. citizens will be outlawed for national security reasons.

Ohio House Speaker Arrested In Bribery Case, Tech Tuesday

Jul 21, 2020
Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder
Paul Vernon / AP

Federal agents earlier this morning arrested Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder and four others in connection to what authorities describe as "a public corruption racketeering conspiracy involving $60 million."

Updated at 9:54 p.m. ET

Facebook on Thursday said it removed campaign posts and advertisements from the Trump campaign featuring an upside down red triangle symbol once used by Nazis to identify political opponents.

The posts, according to a Facebook spokesperson, violated the social network's policy against hate.

"Our policy prohibits using a banned hate group's symbol to identify political prisoners without the context that condemns or discusses the symbol," the spokesperson told NPR.

Updated at 6:08 p.m. ET

President Trump on Friday evening struck a more somber tone talking about the death of George Floyd and recent protests in Minneapolis. The comments at the White House came after a day of criticism over a tweet that referred to protesters there as thugs and prompted a warning from Twitter, which said the president glorified violence.

Updated at 9 p.m. ET

President Trump signed an executive order Thursday aimed at limiting the broad legal protections enjoyed by social media companies, two days after he tore into Twitter for fact-checking two of his tweets.

Updated at 5:36 p.m. ET

Tensions between President Trump and Twitter escalated Wednesday as he threatened to "strongly regulate" or shut down social media platforms, which he accused of silencing conservative viewpoints.

Tech Tuesday: Responding To Coronavirus

Mar 10, 2020
Smarthphone with social media icons
Tero Vesalainen / Pixabay

Tech companies like Facebook, Twitter and Google have responded to the coronavirus health crisis by cutting down on disinformation, waiving fees, and helping users conduct business virtually.

Russia's trolling specialists have evolved their disinformation and agitation techniques to become subtler and tougher to track, according to new research unveiled on Thursday.

A cache of Instagram posts captured by researchers showed that the Russians were "better at impersonating candidates" and that influence-mongers "have moved away from creating their own fake advocacy groups to mimicking and appropriating the names of actual American groups," wrote Young Mie Kim, a University of Wisconsin professor who analyzed the material with her team.

Tech Tuesday: Privacy Rights

Feb 4, 2020
Martin Meissner / Associated Press

Facebook agreed to settle a $550 million class-action lawsuit over its use of facial recognition technology in Illinois. It is believed to be the one of the largest civil settlements involving consumer privacy in U.S. history. 

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

Facebook says it's banning many types of misleading videos from its site, in a push against deepfake content and online misinformation campaigns.

Facebook's new ban targets videos that are manipulated to make it appear someone said words they didn't actually say. The company won't allow videos on its site if they've been either edited or computer-generated in ways that the average person couldn't detect.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

Facebook is changing user policies for its social media platforms to explicitly ban disinformation about and ads trying to discourage participation in the 2020 census, the company announced on its website Thursday.

The company says it plans to enforce these specific bans on all users, including politicians — a departure from previous comments from Facebook officials who said the company did not want to restrict politicians' speech on its platforms.

Users on Instagram will soon be required to enter their birth date in order to use the social networking app. The Facebook-owned company previously only checked that the new user was at least 13 years old.

The changes are being made in the hopes of making the platform safer for younger users, Instagram said in a statement. The birth dates will be used to recommend different privacy settings and features. Birthdays will not be visible to the public.

Cleveland Browns

The Cleveland Browns have cut safety Jermaine Whitehead after he made threatening tweets following Sunday's loss to the Denver Broncos.

Pages