social media

Tech Tuesday: Responding To Coronavirus

Mar 10, 2020
Smarthphone with social media icons
Tero Vesalainen / Pixabay

Tech companies like Facebook, Twitter and Google have responded to the coronavirus health crisis by cutting down on disinformation, waiving fees, and helping users conduct business virtually.

Russia's trolling specialists have evolved their disinformation and agitation techniques to become subtler and tougher to track, according to new research unveiled on Thursday.

A cache of Instagram posts captured by researchers showed that the Russians were "better at impersonating candidates" and that influence-mongers "have moved away from creating their own fake advocacy groups to mimicking and appropriating the names of actual American groups," wrote Young Mie Kim, a University of Wisconsin professor who analyzed the material with her team.

Tech Tuesday: Privacy Rights

Feb 4, 2020
Martin Meissner / Associated Press

Facebook agreed to settle a $550 million class-action lawsuit over its use of facial recognition technology in Illinois. It is believed to be the one of the largest civil settlements involving consumer privacy in U.S. history. 

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

Facebook says it's banning many types of misleading videos from its site, in a push against deepfake content and online misinformation campaigns.

Facebook's new ban targets videos that are manipulated to make it appear someone said words they didn't actually say. The company won't allow videos on its site if they've been either edited or computer-generated in ways that the average person couldn't detect.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

Facebook is changing user policies for its social media platforms to explicitly ban disinformation about and ads trying to discourage participation in the 2020 census, the company announced on its website Thursday.

The company says it plans to enforce these specific bans on all users, including politicians — a departure from previous comments from Facebook officials who said the company did not want to restrict politicians' speech on its platforms.

Users on Instagram will soon be required to enter their birth date in order to use the social networking app. The Facebook-owned company previously only checked that the new user was at least 13 years old.

The changes are being made in the hopes of making the platform safer for younger users, Instagram said in a statement. The birth dates will be used to recommend different privacy settings and features. Birthdays will not be visible to the public.

Cleveland Browns

The Cleveland Browns have cut safety Jermaine Whitehead after he made threatening tweets following Sunday's loss to the Denver Broncos.

The Russian government's interference in the 2016 U.S. elections singled out African Americans, a new Senate committee report concludes.

Using Facebook pages, Instagram content and Twitter posts, Russian information operatives working for the Internet Research Agency had an "overwhelming operational emphasis on race ... no single group of Americans was targeted ... more than African Americans."

Smarthphone with social media icons
Tero Vesalainen / Pixabay

A panel of state senators is hitting the road to gather input on how the broad reach of Facebook and Google impacts average Ohioans.

Tech Tuesday: Social Media Censorship

Aug 13, 2019

The White House is calling for significant changes in how large tech companies manage speech on their websites.

A draft executive order from the White House would put the Federal Communications Commission in charge of developing new regulations clarifying how and when the law protects social media websites when they remove or suppress speech on their platforms.

Today on Tech Tuesday on All Sides with Ann Fisher: social media censorship and more.

Tech Tuesday: Your Data's Worth

Jun 25, 2019
iPhone with social media apps
Christiian Colen / Flickr

Social media outlets like Facebook and Google make money from your data.

They use personal information to craft marketing and advertising materials.

Two U.S. Senators proposed a bipartisan legislation that would pull back the curtain on just how much personal data is worth.

If passed, companies that have more than 100 million users, think Facebook and Amazon, must publicly provide information on the total monetary value of this data, among other information.

Today on All Sides, the value of data, virtual reality, and more.

The Steubenville Rape Case And Toxic Masculinity

Jun 17, 2019
Keith Srakocic / Associated Press

In 2012, two high school football players raped an unconscious underage girl. By the next morning, hundreds of texts and social-media posts crisscrossed the eastern Ohio community of Steubenville. 

Many of the posts included photographs of the girl, which crossed the line into child pornography.

The case attracted worldwide attention and prompted conversations across the country about the misogynistic atmosphere of Steubenville. 

Today on All Sides, we revisit the story and the lessons with documentary filmmaker Nancy Schwartzman. Her new film “Roll Red Roll” premieres tonight on PBS. 

You can stream the film starting tonight on PBS POV. The film will premiere on WOSU-TV Sunday, June 23 at 11 pm EST. 

Mandel Scrubs Content From Twitter, Facebook Accounts

Apr 19, 2019
Former Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel speaking.
Phil Long / Associated Press

Ohio Republican Josh Mandel has scrubbed two social media accounts containing posts critics at times labelled as offensive.

The hashtag #AbledsAreWeird started with a childhood memory that occurred to writer and disability rights activist Imani Barbarin: She was in her community swimming pool when a man threw her crutch into the pool to "help her swim." Naturally, the crutch sank, and she had to fetch it from under water.

State Sen. Andrew Brenner (R-Powell)
Andrew Brenner / Facebook

A spokesperson for Republicans in the Ohio Senate says caucus members have unblocked people on their official social media pages as part of an effort to avoid further legal action.

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