social distancing

Eryn Reynolds, 24, says she's finally finding time to watch the sun set.
Eryn Reynolds

WOSU's Letters from Home collects stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we're continuing to answer the question: What has been the most surprising challenge you've faced from physical distancing? 

Updated April 28, 5:00 p.m. ET

Across the U.S., state leaders are grappling with the challenging decision of when to relax the social distancing restrictions that have helped keep COVID-19 in check.

A majority of Americans — 8 in 10 — say strict shelter-in-place guidelines are worth it, to keep people safe from COVID-19 and control the spread of the virus, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation tracking poll. The same percentage, of around 80% of Americans, also say they can follow the restrictions for at least one more month.

Letters From Home is a new series collecting stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic.
WOSU

WOSU’s Letters from Home is collecting stories from our day-to-day lives through the COVID-19 pandemic. We want to hear your reflections and thoughts.

Bob Grove

When the order came to shelter in place, in the hopes of flattening the infection rate of COVID-19, I immediately thought of Bob Grove.

He’s a friend, has been sheltering in place for over a year. In March 2019, Grove was diagnosed with leukemia, and from that moment on, he has spent most of his time either at the hospital or at home.

Charlotte Stack

WOSU's Letters from Home collects stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we're collecting responses to a new prompt: What has been the most surprising challenge you've faced from physical distancing?

Federal health officials estimated in early April that more than 300,000 Americans could die from COVID-19 if all social distancing measures are abandoned, and later estimates pushed the possible death toll even higher, according to documents obtained by the Center for Public Integrity. Some outside experts say even that grim outlook may be too optimistic.

The documents, created by the Department of Health and Human Services, spell out the data and analysis the agency is sharing with other federal agencies to help shape their responses to the coronavirus.

color photo of Jeff Myers and Siwoo Kim playing violins
publicity photo / Courtesy of Jeffrey Myers and Siwoo Kim

Many folks these days are finding ways to be productive while sheltering at home. New York City residents Jeffrey Myers and Siwoo Kim escaped New York’s COVID-19 crisis and headed to Columbus, where they made their time in self-quarantine count.

color photo of split screen with Devin Copfer playing violin and Shane Harris playing tuba
Devin Copfer and Shane Harris / Courtesy of Chamber Brews

A glass artist making sculptures in her garage. Musicians playing duets by splicing together self-recorded video. A dance company holding classes and auditions on Zoom.

Ohio’s COVID-19 stay-at-home directive has forced some Columbus artists to get creative about how they work.

Macey Phillips

WOSU's Letters from Home is a new series collecting stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we're collecting responses to a new prompt: What has been the most surprising challenge you've faced from physical distancing? Submit your stories below.

City Atty. Zach Klein and Columbus Councilmember Shayla Favor.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus City Attorney Zach Klein is cracking down on house parties, saying too many people are ignoring gathering restrictions during the coronavirus pandemic.

Appalachian youth (clockwise from top left Caci Gibson, Lou Murrey, Mekyah Davis and Larah Helayne) strategize mutual aid during the coronavirus.
Sydney Boles / Ohio Valley ReSource

On March 17, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam banned gatherings of 10 or more people to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Mehyah Davis, 23, was in his second week of a new job waiting tables at the cryptid-inspired Wood Booger Grill in Norton, Va.

Solid Rock Church in Warren County has come under fire for continuing to hold in-person services and meetings during the coronavirus pandemic.
Wikimedia Commons

In spite of stay-at-home orders in Ohio and other states, there were a handful of churches across the country that still held in-person Easter services on Sunday, including the Solid Rock Church in Monroe north of Cincinnati.

Madison McHugh McGraw and Grant McGraw greet guests in the parking lot of a Deleware County church.
Courtsey of MADISON MCHUGH MCGRAW

Social distancing and Ohio's stay-at-home order have caused a lot of people to change their plans. But some tenacious Ohioans aren’t letting the coronavirus pandemic get in their way, and are getting creative about finding alternatives.

Unlike the old fashioned head count some stores are using to keep customers socially distanced, Kroger is using camera sensors and predictive analytics, freeing up more employees to work inside the store.

Pages