social distancing

WOSU’s Letters from Home is collecting stories from our day-to-day lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. We want to hear reflections and thoughts from Ohioans of all stripes.

Mike Kapeluck, left to right, Michael Cole, and Ashley Healy have lunch outside of the The Corner Alley during the coronavirus pandemic, Friday, May 15, 2020, in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / AP

The owners of eight bars and restaurants in Northeast Ohio are suing Gov. Mike DeWine and Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton over rules put in place for restaurants to reopen following closure due to the coronavirus.

Amber Wacker sits amidst her plants, "savoring the last dregs of Yosemite."
Amber Wacker

WOSU's Letters from Home collects stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we heard from Ohioans answering the question: Where have you found distraction and relief during this time?

Wedding venues, banquet halls and large catering facilities can reopen June 1st. And some venues say they are ready to open now.

color photo of MACCO musicians and conductor playing and conducting in separate spaces
Courtesy of the McCOnnell Arts Center Chamber Orchestra

For the foreseeable future, the internet may be the only safe place where musicians and audiences can come together.

That’s why the musicians of Worthington’s McConnell Arts Center Chamber Orchestra (MACCO) have gone virtual, turning their own homes into recording studios and using smartphones and other high-tech tools to give a performance of music by J.S. Bach.

Standard Hall in the Short North was cited multiple times over the weekend for violating state health guidelines.
Standard Hall / Facebook

In Columbus, nine bars and restaurants were cited for violating social distancing requirements after patios were allowed to reopen Friday.

There's a new drink on the menu at the Twisted Citrus, and it matches some new drapery.

The Rubber Duckie Mimosa, a concoction of champagne and blue rasberry lemonade with a classic yellow rubber duck floating on top, was inspired by the North Canton, Ohio breakfast joint's method of protecting its patrons from the spread of COVID-19: shower curtains.

Woman writing on a dock.
T.S. Dusseau

WOSU's Letters from Home collects stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we heard from Ohioans answering the question: How have you created or maintained meaningful personal relationships? 

Photo of James Thomas
James Thomas

WOSU's Letters from Home collects stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we heard from Ohioans answering the question: How have you created or maintained meaningful personal relationships? 

Abigail Hazlett talks about concerns she has about returning to her job at a telemarketing office.
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

After being shut down as non-essential in March, retail stores can join other businesses in Ohio starting Tuesday, operating with new restrictions to help prevent the spread of coronavirus. However, some workers say they’re worried about going back.

Schools across the country are figuring out how to recognize graduating seniors who are missing out on the usual pomp and circumstance of their final year of high school. Mason High School in suburban Cincinnati, Ohio's largest high school, says it will try to honor every student.

A gloved shopper prepares to load up her purchases in the Kroger parking lot in northeast Jackson, Miss., Wednesday, April 8, 2020.
Rogelio V. Solis / Associated Press

In Dayton, supermarkets are taking a host of measures designed to promote social distancing and keep shelves stocked and supply chains moving. They’re capping shopper numbers, enforcing one-way aisles and socially distanced checkout lines.

Wikipedia

WOSU's Letters from Home collects stories about day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we're continuing to answer the question: What has been the most surprising challenge you've faced from physical distancing?

President Trump said the existing coronavirus social distancing guidelines that are set to expire with the end of April on Thursday will not be extended further, as more governors begin steps to lift restrictions and reopen their economies.

The administration said the existing social distancing recommendations are being incorporated by governors into their new future plans.

"They'll be fading out, because now the governors are doing it," Trump said.

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