social distancing

President Donald Trump removes his mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington, after leaving Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine says that President Trump's diagnosis and hospitalization should be a reminder that "no one is immune" from COVID-19.

color photo of Andrés Lopera holding baton
Stephen Pariser / Courtesy of the Columbus Symphnoy Orchestra

Being able to be in more than one place at the same time might seem like a futuristic dream, but it will soon be a reality for the Columbus Symphony Orchestra. For the next two weeks they will play a series of 18 free outdoor concerts in multiple venues at the same time.

color aerial photo of cars parked in Headley Park parking lot
City of Gahanna Department of Parks and Recreation / Courtesy of ProMusica Chamber Orchestra

While concert halls remain quiet amid the coronavirus pandemic, Columbus’ ProMusica Chamber Orchestra is heading outside and popping up around town in a summer concert series.

two people Social distancing at Antrim Lake in Columbus Ohio
David Holm / WOSU

WOSU's Letters from Home is collecting stories about our day-to-day lives during the coronavirus pandemic. This week, we heard from more Ohioans who shared reflections on decisions they've made in light of COVID-19. 

Ohio officials have focused testing resources in high-risk areas, like Cuyahoga County and other more populated areas.

But what about less populated rural Ohio communities? Geauga County, for example, remains at Level 1 out of 4 in the state’s risk assessment, even as adjacent counties have seen large increases in COVID-19 cases.

Does that actually mean there’s less coronavirus spread there?

Not necessarily, said Geauga County Health Commissioner Tom Quade.

WOSU’s Letters from Home is collecting stories from our day-to-day lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. We want to hear reflections and thoughts from all Ohioans.

Former Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder
Paul Vernon / AP

Gov. Mike DeWine’s Wednesday evening speech seemed to be a warning to Ohioans to wear masks or risk another round of shutdowns and closures.

They fume and rage and demand their rights. Sometimes they even get violent.

In the age of COVID-19, most people practice social distancing guidelines when they go into stores and restaurants, putting on masks and standing 6 feet behind other customers.

Still, there are the nightmare customers — those who refuse to comply.

"I've had a lot of conflict. I've had a lot of pushback from people," says Brenda Leek, owner of Curbside Eatery in La Mesa, Calif.

A collection of masks made by Sew-hio sewing club.
Marian Jacques

Twelve Ohio counties are under an order by Gov. Mike DeWine to wear masks in indoor spaces and outdoors where social distancing isn’t possible.

That order is meant to reduce coronavirus rates in areas of the state where the virus is raging out of control, but it's being met with somewhat mixed reaction.

Laurie Granger is a manager and bartender at a cocktail bar in the Short North.
Ash Gerlach / Courtesy of Two Truths

Columbus was logging about 80 new cases of COVID-19 per day when bars and restaurants were ordered to close across the state. Lately, the numbers have been more than double that.

A typical Fourth of July usually has lots of flags, fireworks and parades. But this year is anything but typical as the pandemic has benched marching bands, banned floats, and sidelined spectators.

In Montgomery, Ohio — a small suburban Cincinnati community of about 10,000 where lawns are lush green and American flags abound — the annual Fourth of July parade is a long tradition. So when the pandemic threatened to cancel the annual parade, they decided to retool it.

When asked if he could imagine a college party where everyone is wearing masks, Jacques du Passage, a sophomore at Louisiana State University, laughs.

"No. I don't think they would do that," he says. "I think [students] would just have the party and then face the repercussions."

That's exactly what Apramay Mishra, student body president at the University of Kansas, is worried about when it comes to reopening campus amid the pandemic. "Right now it's kind of slipped from most people's minds," he says. Students "don't really think it's a big deal."

Mike Kapeluck, left to right, Michael Cole, and Ashley Healy have lunch outside of the The Corner Alley during the coronavirus pandemic, Friday, May 15, 2020, in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / AP

For two consecutive days in a row, Ohio saw the largest spikes in confirmed coronavirus cases since April, with 892 newly reported cases Thursday and 987 cases Friday.

WOSU’s Letters from Home is collecting stories from our day-to-day lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. We want to hear reflections and thoughts from Ohioans of all stripes.

One of the hardest things during this pandemic — for kids and adult children — has been staying away from their parents and grandparents.

People 65 years and older are at higher risk for getting a severe case of COVID-19, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And about 80% of deaths in the U.S. from COVID-19 have been in people older than 65.

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