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Senate

Ohio Governor John Kasich
Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press

Republican Ohio Governor John Kasich is skeptical about the extent of the blue wave some political pundits have projected this November.

Phil Long / Associated Press

Candidates in Ohio's U.S. Senate campaign on Saturday argued in a second debate over different positions on taxes, immigration, gun control, climate change, the influence of money on politics and health care.

The battle for the Senate is being fought on Republican-friendly turf, and with three weeks until Election Day the GOP is increasingly optimistic that the chamber will remain in the party's grasp.

Fears that a fiery Democratic opposition could turn the map upside down have abated some, now that the GOP base is more tuned in following the confirmation fight over Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Updated at 8:52 p.m. ET

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has a message for Republican voters who are celebrating the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh: Get to the polls in November if you want more conservatives sitting on judicial benches.

Updated at 11:31 p.m. ET

A sharply divided Senate — reflecting a deeply divided nation — voted almost entirely along party lines Saturday afternoon to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

A little more than two hours later, Kavanaugh was sworn in during a private ceremony as protesters stood on the court's steps.

Former Ohio Congressman Jim Renacci
Mark Duncan / Associated Press

U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci, a Republican congressman vying for U.S. Senate in Ohio, has used a strip-club owner's private plane to fly to campaign events, campaign finance records show.

The Republican candidate for governor is now clarifying his earlier statements about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, saying there should be no rush to confirm him.

Senate Overwhelmingly Passes Opioid Legislation

Sep 18, 2018
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Republicans and Democrats joined forces to speed legislation combating the misuse of opioids and other addictive drugs through Senate passage Monday, a rare campaign-season show of unity against a growing and deadly health care crisis.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

As the confirmation vote for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh neared, both parties had seen potential political benefits for them in the upcoming midterm elections.

For Republicans, it was a chance to energize the base by putting another conservative justice on the court, potentially reshaping it for a generation.

For Democrats, the specter of rolling back abortion rights, the Affordable Care Act and more was a way to further energize an already engaged liberal base to go to the polls.

Ohio U.S. Senator Rob Portman
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) introduced U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh at a contentious hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday.

Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press

Sen. Rob Portman will be among the bipartisan team introducing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh as the Senate Judiciary Committee begins confirmation hearings Tuesday.

Watch Live: Brett Kavanaugh Begins Confirmation Hearings

Sep 4, 2018
Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

Opening statements are underway in the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Watch the hearing live below, courtesy of NPR.

Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press

Ohio’s two U.S. Senators met with U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh ahead of what are likely to be heated Senate confirmation hearings.

President Trump's second VA secretary, Robert Wilkie, was confirmed 86-9 by the Senate on Monday. He takes the helm of the second largest department in the U.S. government, with more than 350,000 employees, a nearly $200 billion budget and almost 20 million American veterans depending on it for care and benefits.

That may sound like a herculean task. Now add that the department has been in turmoil since Trump sacked his first VA secretary, David Shulkin, with dozens of senior staff, subject matter experts and career officials quitting or being pushed out.

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