science

Updated at 6:55 a.m. ET

This year's Nobel Prize in Physics has been "split" — with one half going to Arthur Ashkin, an American who won for his work with optical tweezers, while Gérard Mourou of France and Donna Strickland of Canada share the other half for work in generating high-intensity ultrashort optical pulses.

Together, their achievements mark groundbreaking achievements in the field of laser physics.

"This year's prize is about tools made from light," said the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm in its announcement on Tuesday.

Scientists say they have taken a potentially important — and possibly controversial — step toward creating human eggs in a lab dish.

A team of Japanese scientists turned human blood cells into stem cells, which they then transformed into very immature human eggs.

The eggs are far too immature to be fertilized or make a baby. And much more research would be needed to create eggs that could be useful — and safe — for human reproduction.

The new head of NASA is saying good things about the NASA Glenn Research Center in northern Ohio.

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center scientists, in the process of creating a human gastrointestinal system in a lab, have grown an esophagus.

Steve Brown / WOSU

Right here in Columbus are a series of databases that some scientists and business leaders call the world’s most valuable collection of scientific data. This week, they'll be used to train some of the world’s best young scientists.

Editor's note on Aug. 8, 2018: This piece has been substantially updated from a version published in 2014.

A solemn little boy with a bowl haircut is telling Mr. Rogers that his pet got hit by a car. More precisely, he's confiding this to Daniel Striped Tiger, the hand puppet that, Rogers' wife, Joanne, says, "pretty much was Fred."

Nikola Tesla's Modern Influence

Jun 15, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Born in 1856 in what is now Croatia, Nikola Tesla would grow up to become one of the most influential inventors of the 19th and early 20th centuries. While he never reached the stardom that his biggest rival Thomas Edison did, his patents and ideas shape much of modern technology. In his new book, Richard Munson explores Tesla's eccentricities and personal life as well as his scientific achievements.

Join us today as we discuss Tesla's life and the impact his inventions had on the world.

Nikola Tesla's Modern Influence

May 30, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Born in 1856 in what is now Croatia, Nikola Tesla would grow up to become one of the most influential inventors of the 19th and early 20th centuries. While he never reached the stardom that his biggest rival Thomas Edison did, his patents and ideas shape much of modern technology. In his new book, Richard Munson explores Tesla's eccentricities and personal life as well as his scientific achievements.

Join us today as we discuss Tesla's life and the impact his inventions had on the world.

COSI sign
Experience Columbus

In an effort to “demystify science and engineering,” leaders of COSI announced on Tuesday that the science museum will host a four-day science festival next May.

COSI President and CEO Frederic Bertley says schools, churches and local businesses will host three days of science demonstrations, followed by a full day of demonstrations at COSI.

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, has proposed a new rule that restricts scientific research that can be used by the agency for its regulatory decisions.

The proposed rule only allows the use of studies that make all data publicly available for anyone to analyze. Pruitt proposed the new rule as a way to make the agency's decision-making more "transparent, objective and measurable."

Crackling sounds deep inside the brain signal normal communication among an estimated 100 billion neurons. But after a traumatic health event like a brain injury or a heart attack, the brain goes silent. If the patient isn't revived, a massive wave of electrochemical energy is released that gradually poisons the nerve cells.

Welcome to Invisibilia Season 4! The NPR program and podcast explores the invisible forces that shape human behavior, and we here at Shots are joining in to probe the often tenuous line between perception and reality. Here's a personal essay by the host that expands on Episode 1.

Anaiah Brooks is a sixth grader at John P. Parker school in Madisonville. She wants to be a baker when she grows up. She already knows chemistry is a big part of baking. And so Anaiah is big into science.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press

Robyn Wilson, associate professor of risk analysis and decision science at The Ohio State University, had served on the EPA’s Science Advisory Board for nearly two and a half years when she received a request to step down. The problem, it seemed, was the fact her research had been funded by an EPA grant. 

Jeff St. Clair / WKSU

Meredith Balogh does a quick inventory of her diabetes survival pack.

“We’ve got insulin pens: these are a fast acting and a long acting,” Balogh says. “We’ve got extra lancing devices for checking your blood sugar; glucose meter, strips for that.”

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