Rivet | WOSU Radio

Rivet

Rivet is a podcast from WOSU Public Media hosted by Leticia Wiggins. Rivet is developed with support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and is part of the national initiative American Graduate: Getting To Work.

On Rivet, young people share their stories of getting ahead, taking pathways outside of a four-year college degree. This series explores other options that can get us into good jobs that pay – jobs we enjoy.

Find Rivet on NPR One, Spotify, Stitcher, Apple PodcastsWOSU’s Mobile App, or subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Sierra Roberts and a coworker collaborate at the Ohio Mutual office space in Bucyrus, Ohio.
Rivet / WOSU

Sierra Roberts knew the jingles and taglines about insurance. It’s that thing you pay for now in case something goes wrong later. It’s those commercials constantly clamoring for our attention.

Billan Gurreh sits studying with a classmate at C-TEC Licking County.
Rivet / WOSU

A 45-minute bus ride to a different city gave 17-year-old Billan Gurreh plenty of time to wonder if she was making the right choice. She was nervous to start the year off at a new school.

Chris Dible presents a vintage Case tractor at Dible Brothers' Farm in Sunbury, Ohio.
Rivet / WOSU

Chris Dible, 17, walks past a giant red and black tractor. It’s the tractor Dible helped his dad bargain for when he was 13. Standing here, he can’t help but think about his family.

Miguel Tucker gives a speech to graduating Building Futures class.
Rivet / WOSU

Miguel Tucker, 30, grew up in Columbus. As a kid, he says, he spent a lot of time around negative influences.

Danavan McIntosh programs the 3-D printer in a tech lab at Goodwill Columbus.
Leticia Wiggins / WOSU

During an early shift at FedEx, Danavan McIntosh made his way down a tall ladder. He'd done it a million times before. This time, he felt himself falling.

Amanda Wisniewski (right) and friend Caitlin Wingfield, who she met on the job, enjoy a Columbus crew game.
Courtesy of Amanda Wisniewski

Amanda Wisniewski discovered her niche while processing specimens at medical testing company, LabCorp.

“I found what I wanted to do forever, because something just clicked,” she says. “Working on the robotics and fixing the problems, it was the highlight of my day.”

Dashawn Hodge found his first job through the Boys and Girls Club's Summer Work Program.
Leticia Wiggins / WOSU

Dashawn Hodge is just a normal 14-year-old boy who hates cutting the grass.

“My mom told me when I get home, I gotta cut the grass,” he says. “I looked at her like, ‘No, I can’t cut the grass!”

Jordan Washington switched careers to be an electrician, which he's learning on the job as part of a five-year apprenticeship.
Rivet / WOSU

Driving a semi-truck is a job that gives you plenty of time to think – too much, actually, for Jordan Washington. He says the job paid well, and it was fun in the beginning until the monotony sunk in.

“But then after a while, I’m just like, 'O.K., I’m bored. This is not for me,’” Washington says.

Erica Miller at the Stanley Electric plant in London, Ohio.
LETICIA WIGGINS / WOSU

Like most kids, Erica Miller loved riding the merry-go-round when she was little.  Her mom took her often to the one at the Columbus Zoo. Miller was always more interested in the gears than the ponies, though.