Republicans

Ohio State College Republicans make phone calls for the Trump campaign in September.
Ohio State College Republicans / Twitter

Handing out flyers. Accosting fellow students in between classes. Handwritten signs and decorated tables on the oval. That’s what voter outreach on campus used to look like. 

The House overwhelmingly approved a resolution condemning QAnon, the fringe movement that promotes wide-ranging conspiracies about the U.S. government and yet has enjoyed a rising tide inside conservative politics in part because of tacit encouragement from President Trump.

The measure passed 371-18, with one GOP member voting present.

QAnon is a "collective delusion," said House Rules Chairman Jim McGovern, D-Mass., "We all must call it what it is: a sick cult."

Operation Grant supporters in front of the Ohio Statehouse.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the presidential debate debacle in Cleveland and why some Ohio Republicans are working to elect Joe Biden. Phil Heimlich, a founding member of Operation Grant, joins the show.

Think "climate change activist" and a young, liberal student may come to mind.

A recent NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll showed climate change is the top issue for Democratic voters. For Republicans, it barely registers overall, but there is a growing generational divide.

Updated at 9:23 p.m. ET

President Trump resumed questioning the integrity of this year's election on Thursday after the White House sought to walk back his earlier comments suggesting he might not accept the results if he were to lose.

The back-and-forth started on Wednesday evening at a press conference.

Hunter Biden's position on the board of a Ukrainian energy company was "awkward" and "problematic" at the time his father, Joe Biden, was serving as vice president, two Republican-led Senate committees say in a new report — but the study does not show that it influenced U.S. government policy.

The long-awaited Republican report appeared six weeks ahead of the presidential election. Democrats have dismissed it as a politically motivated effort to try to hamper Biden's 2020 campaign in the race against President Trump.

Operation Grant supporters in front of the Ohio Statehouse.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

A group of Ohioans who have been influential in Republican party leadership say they’re coming together for one purpose: to defeat President Trump in November.

A central promise of last week's Republican National Convention was a pledge that President Trump would use a second term to build on elements of his first term, with very few updates and changes.

The four days of convention programming showed a Republican Party whose policies are bound to Trump. But GOP divisions over many of those policies prevented much of the 2016 Trump agenda from ever becoming law. And that dynamic was in place well before the coronavirus pandemic changed politics.

Ask any Republican strategist about the state of their party in 2020 and you'll get an answer something like this from GOP consultant Antonia Ferrier. "This is Donald Trump's party," she said, "and I don't think that should be much of a surprise."

Geno DiFabio, Youngstown truck driver, talking with Vice President Mike Pence outside of the boyhood home of Abraham Lincoln in Indiana.
RNC

A truck driver from Youngstown, Geno DiFabio, was featured during the second night of the Republican National Convention as part of the night's general theme "Land of Opportunity," arguing that President Donald Trump's policies help create economic opportunity.

A viewer watching the Republican National Convention on Monday night could be forgiven for thinking that Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were not the Democratic Party's presidential and vice presidential nominees but were leading a different ticket altogether.

"Biden, Harris and their socialist comrades will fundamentally change this nation," Trump campaign adviser Kimberly Guilfoyle warned.

Almost 30 million people are now collecting unemployment benefits. Yet President Trump still gets relatively high marks for his handling of the economy.

As Republicans focus on "opportunity" at their convention Tuesday, the economy remains one of the president's strongest selling points.

"You see the kind of numbers that we're putting up. They're unbelievable," Trump told supporters in Minnesota last week. "More jobs in the last three months than ever before."

Follow live coverage of the RNC all week at NPR.org/conventions.

The first night of the Republican National Convention was a little scattershot. It seemed to be partially about counter-programming the Democratic National Convention last week, partially intended to fire up the base and partially aimed at winning back some of those 2016 Trump voters who are having second thoughts.

President Donald Trump speaks to the Ohio Republican Party State Dinner, Friday, Aug. 24, 2018, in Columbus.
Evan Vucci / AP

President Donald Trump's campaign in Ohio is preparing for a busy week, running many events in collaboration with the Republican National Convention. The president's supporters say people will see a very different message compared to last week's Democratic National Convention.

Since the Democrats wrapped up their glitch-free virtual convention, now it's Republicans' turn.

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