religious freedom

High school runner Noor Alexandria Abukaram and state Sen. Theresa Gavarone at the Ohio Statehouse.
Theresa Gavarone / Twitter

An Ohio senator has introduced new legislation aimed at protecting the religious expression of athletes. The bill was inspired by an Ohio teen disqualified from a cross-country race for wearing a hijab without a required waiver.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

Just hours before President Trump addressed thousands of anti-abortion rights activists at the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C., his administration has given its attendees reason to cheer.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

President Trump on Thursday defended students who feel they can't pray in their schools — and warned school administrators they risk losing federal funds if they violate their students' rights to religious expression.

Trump held an event in the Oval Office with a group of Christian, Jewish and Muslim students and teachers to commemorate National Religious Freedom Day. The students and teachers said they have been discriminated against for practicing their religion at school.

The nativity display at Ohio Statehouse was paid for by the conservative Thomas More Society.
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

A small nativity, complete with a figure representing newborn Jesus, is on display at the Ohio Statehouse right now. The state lawmakers and private group who want it there say it’s perfectly constitutional.

Licking Heights High School freshmen take notes in a World History class taught by Amy Obhof..
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Some Ohio lawmakers are backing a bill passed by the House that they say protects the religious rights of students. Opponents say it’s unnecessary and would hurt the academic integrity of schools.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Nov 18, 2019
The Ohio Statehouse in downtown Columbus.
Wikimedia

Two dozen state lawmakers have introduce a bill that would ban abortions in Ohio.

House Bill 413 would legally recognize an unborn human as a person.

Today on the Reporter Roundtable on All Sides with Ann Fisher: the politics of abortion, another school funding plan, and the impeachment inquiry. 

 

Guests

The federal government's rule designed to support health workers who opt out of providing care that violates their moral or religious beliefs will not go into effect in July as scheduled. The effective date has been delayed by four months, according to court orders.

It's decision season at the U.S. Supreme Court, and there are a host of consequential cases the justices are deciding, from a controversial Trump administration proposal to adding a citizenship question to the census to gerrymandering and a question of separation of church and state.

As always, timing of which exact cases will be decided is unknown until the court releases them. The only clues are when the cases were argued, and, sometimes, that's not predictive either.

The bitter battle over the death penalty continued Monday at the U.S. Supreme Court with the highly unusual release of explanatory statements from the court's conservatives as to why they reached such apparently contradictory decisions in two death cases in February and March.

Dan Keck / Flickr

The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to hear an appeal involving Upper Arlington and a local Christian school trying to move into a building zoned for commercial use.

The Trump administration issued a new rule Thursday that gives health care workers leeway to refuse to provide services like abortion, sterilization or assisted suicide, if they cite a religious or conscientious objection.

The rule, issued by the Department of Health and Human Services, is designed to protect the religious rights of health care providers and religious institutions.

According to a statement issued by HHS's Office for Civil Rights, the new rule affirms existing conscience protections established by Congress.

The original story behind the Masterpiece Cakeshop case is both undisputed and well known: a gay couple in Colorado walked into the bakery in 2012 and asked for wedding cake. The owner and master baker Jack Phillips declined to make a custom cake for their party because he said their union violated his religious beliefs.

The couple filed a complaint with the state's civil rights commission, which found Phillips was violating the state's anti-discrimination laws that prohibit businesses from discriminating against LGBTQ people.

church pastor robe
Columbus Neighborhoods / WOSU

A bill that sponsors say ensures religious freedom when it comes to marriage ceremonies is moving through the Ohio Legislature. However opponents are urgently trying to stop the so-called “Pastor Protection Act,” saying it overreaches and creates more opportunities to discriminate.

Josh Mandel

Republican U.S. Senate candidate Josh Mandel has created a faith outreach team whose first goal is repeal of a federal law prohibiting religious organizations and other charitable groups from backing political candidates.

President Trump is set to sign an executive order on Thursday that aims to relax restrictions on political activity by religious groups without threatening their tax-exempt status.

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