Refugees | WOSU Radio

Refugees

Updated 8:38 p.m. ET

President Trump has ordered that the number of refugees allowed to resettle in the U.S. in the coming year be cut nearly in half to 18,000, down from the administration's previous refugee ceiling of 30,000.

The limit represents the lowest number of refugees seeking protection from violence or political persecution allowed into the country since the modern refugee program was established in 1980.

At a rally Tuesday at US Together, Julie Momoh tells her story about being a refugee.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Immigration organizers in Columbus are criticizing the Trump administration’s proposed cap on refugee resettlement.

It's the first day of school in Missoula, Mont., and Elongo Gabriel, a Congolese refugee, is dropping off his young son and two daughters.

A proud father, he has a wide grin. "For me it's like a dream to get a chance for my kids to study here," he says.

Getting here, to a safe place, has been a long and traumatic saga. His family fled war in their home country where Elongo worked for a human rights NGO. They then spent six years in Tanzania in a destitute refugee camp, with little to no schooling available and on most days only cassava to eat.

Across the United States, there’s a push to give new doctors cultural training to work with refugees and other immigrants. And some say it’s the difference between healthy and sick patients.

A University of Cincinnati space professor who studies everything from Mars to maps is taking a deeper look into why so many people are coming to the U.S. Twenty-five years of satellite maps show deforestation and subsequent climate change are driving migrants to leave Central America.

As many as 150 refugees are believed dead after their wooden boat that had been bound for Europe capsized off Libya's coast. According to the United Nations, it's the worst loss of life this year in Mediterranean.

On Wednesday night, the boat departed from Al Khoms, Libya, about 75 miles east of the capital, Tripoli. It sank on Thursday, five miles from Libya's coast.

Columbus City Councilmember Elizabeth Brown (left) speaks out about proposed cuts to refugee admissions as Columbus City Councilmember Rob Dorans (right) looks on.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

A Columbus non-profit that works with immigrants and refugees held a rally on Tuesday to speak out against a proposal to completely cut refugee admissions to the U.S. next year.

Updated: Tuesday, 9:04 a.m.

Cincinnati's Mauritanian community wants Congress to address human rights issues in their native country. Community advocates rallied Monday to raise awareness of issues going on in the West African country.

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, left, and Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, speak to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Ohio's U.S. senators plan to visit the U.S.-Mexico border this weekend to observe firsthand the conditions at U.S. Customs And Border Protection detention facilities.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

Editor's note: This story contains images that some readers may find disturbing.

The desperate and tragic plight of a father and daughter who drowned while trying to cross the border from Mexico into the U.S. has become a new flashpoint in the border crisis, after a photographer captured a haunting image that shows the pair lying facedown, washed onto the banks of the Rio Grande.

The Trump administration is canceling English classes, recreational activities including soccer, and legal aid for unaccompanied migrant children who are staying in federally contracted migrant shelters.

The Office of Refugee Resettlement, which is charged with caring for minors who arrive at the Southern border without a parent or legal guardian, says the large influx of migrants in recent months is straining its already threadbare budget. ORR is part of the Department of Health and Human Services.

At a pediatric clinic in Kirksville, Mo., a young boy is waiting in an exam room to be vaccinated. A nurse explains the shots to his mother, and Lisette Chibanvunya translates.

Kazito Kalima was 14 at the start of the Rwandan genocide. Over just a few months in 1994, hundreds of thousands of Tutsi people in his country were killed, including most of his family.

Many artists like to create works in response to current events.  But sometimes, the cost of materials, equipment and studio space are too high, and it takes forever to jump through the hoops necessary to get financial backing.  A new fund aims to help local artists react to the latest headlines.

Filmmaker Cigdem Slankard, an assistant professor of film and media arts at Cleveland State University, is one of those artists. In her studio, she smiled at a scene from her latest production, playing out on the editing screen.

Ohio Museums Share Ideas for Inclusivity

Apr 15, 2019

Many museums across the state and nation are working to better serve people who historically have not been visiting or feeling welcome.

“Becoming an inclusive, diverse and accessible space is not something that can be achieved by a single program or exhibit,” said Johnna McEntee, executive director of the Ohio Museums Association.

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