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red flag law

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss on ongoing debate over the governor's proposed gun regulations. Dean Rieck, executive director of the Buckeye Firearms Association, joins the show. 

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich
AP

One of Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed gun law changes in the wake of the Dayton shooting is an idea that’s been talked about before and passed in 17 other states. The bill more commonly known as a "red flag law" would provide a way to remove guns from people who are thought to be dangerous to themselves or others.

State senators are reintroducing a "Red Flag" bill with the support of Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering) who says she's no longer satisfied with the status quo.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss how recent mass shooting have pushed some lawmakers to propose new gun legislation. Ohioans for Gun Safety spokesperson Dennis Willard joins the show.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) has said he wants input from gun rights advocates as he works on his plan to reduce gun violence, but some of Ohio's largest groups seem to be split on his proposal.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

Gov. Mike DeWine is calling for a version of the "Red Flag Law," expanded background checks, and other gun control proposals in the wake of the mass shooting in Dayton that left nine people dead. These proposals represent a dramatic shift in the way Ohio's state leadership has handled gun policies for most of the decade.

President Trump went before cameras on Monday in highly anticipated remarks following the mass shootings in Ohio and Texas over the weekend. In his remarks at the White House, Trump used the words "domestic terrorism" and "white supremacy." He did not acknowledge his own rhetoric.

The president targeted violent video games and drew a connection between mass shootings and mental health, though the research does not back up his assertions.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Facing pressure to take action after the nation’s latest mass shooting, Gov. Mike DeWine urged Ohio’s GOP-led state legislature Tuesday to pass laws requiring background checks for nearly all gun sales and allowing courts to restrict firearms access for people perceived as threats.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Government leaders from around the state extended their condolences to the families and friends who lost loved ones during the mass shooting in Dayton, while some top leaders called for legislation to prevent such an attack in the future.

WorldSpectrum / Pixabay

Earlier this year, police dispatchers in Evansville, Ind., received a chilling call. A man said he was holding his wife at knifepoint, and he warned police that he was heavily armed.

Lisa Marie Pane / AP

Numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and the Ohio Highway Patrol show 430 more people died from gun related deaths in 2017 than in car accidents. Lawmakers have different ideas on what should be done to make Ohioans safer while insuring their constitutional rights to bear arms.

Lisa Marie Pane / AP

Gov. Mike DeWine says he’s deeply concerned about attacks at houses of worship, including at a synagogue in California this weekend. That has him looking into a specific type of gun legislation, the so-called "red flag" bill, which failed to move in the Republican-dominated legislature last year.

Lisa Marie Pane / AP

Ohio Senate president Larry Obhof (R-Medina) said he's open to discussing two high-profile gun laws when the General Assembly returns next year: the "Stand Your Ground" bill and the "red flag law."

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

This was the year Ohio saw a dramatic tone shift when it comes to gun policies – at least when it came to Gov. John Kasich.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Ohio lawmakers are preparing to return to the Statehouse for what looks like a busy lame duck session. Legislators are expected to pass a slew of bills before the year ends.

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