racial disparities

The vast majority of children dying from COVID-19 are Hispanic, Black or Native American, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Researchers analyzed the number of coronavirus cases and deaths among people under the age of 21 that were reported to the CDC between Feb. 12 and July 31 of this year. They found more than 390,000 cases and 121 deaths.

Cars are absent from 3rd Street in downtown Columbus on May 6, 2020, in the middle of Ohio's stay-at-home order.
David Holm / WOSU

According to a Financial Empowerment Roadmap released by the city of Columbus, residents of color are in greater debt and have less wealth than the city's white residents.

Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, mortality rates and life expectancy are far better for white Americans than they are for Black people during normal, non-pandemic years, according to an analysis published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Marin County, just north of San Francisco, is best known nationally as a picturesque gateway to wine country and home to moneyed tech investors and a handful of aging rock stars. The reality, of course, is more complicated.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Aug 17, 2020
Taylor Williams, left, and other shoppers what in line to enter a Traders Joes store, Monday, April 6, 2020, in Woodmere Village, Ohio. Only 25 customers are allowed in the store at one time.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Black Ohioans represent 14% of the state’s population but one-in-four of Ohio's positive COVID-19 cases, nearly a third of all hospitalizations and one-in-five associated deaths. That’s why Gov. Mike DeWine last week reiterated the growing call to see racism as a public health crisis.

Black Americans are becoming infected with the coronavirus at a rate three times that of whites and they are twice as likely to die from COVID-19, according to a new report from the National Urban League, based partly on data from Johns Hopkins University.

A key focus of Thursday's report is the impact of the pandemic and how the disease has followed the contours of the larger society in falling especially hard on Blacks, Latinos and Indigenous people.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) called racism a public health crisis while releasing a report from a task force created to look into how COVID-19 is hitting people of color disproportionately.

Leon McDougle is the newest leader of the association that seeks to shrink health disparities among African Americans.
Ohio State University

An Ohio State University professor is now leading the nation’s oldest association of Black doctors.

In the midst of another hot summer and an ongoing pandemic, public parks are vital refuge. But a new study has found that access to parks in the U.S. differs sharply according to income and race.

A study published by The Trust for Public Land found that parks serving primarily nonwhite populations are, on average, half the size of parks that serve majority-white populations, and are potentially five times more crowded.

Cincinnati Children's

Doctors from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center say that Latina and Black pregnant women in their hospitals are testing positive for COVID-19 at disproportionately high rates. They looked at cases from the 14 hospitals covered by the medical center’s neonatology division, stretching from the Dayton area to Northern Kentucky. 

Last month, Cleveland’s elected officials and nonprofit leaders took to the steps of City Hall to hail a declaration by city council that racism is a public health crisis.

Around the country, communities of color continue to be among the hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic. So in many of these communities, local leaders are stepping in to try to help solve a problem they say is years in the making.

In Richmond, Va., crews of local firefighters and volunteers have been fanning out across the city, going door to door with plastic bags filled with masks, hand sanitizer and information about staying healthy.

This spring, as it became clear COVID-19 was hitting African-Americans especially hard, Indianapolis-area health officials vowed to set up testing sites in “hotspot” neighborhoods. One opened in predominantly Black Arlington Woods, at a respected local institution: Eastern Star Church.

New federal data reinforces the stark racial disparities that have appeared with COVID-19: According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Black Americans enrolled in Medicare were hospitalized with the disease at rates nearly four times higher than their white counterparts.

Protesters in downtown Columbus on June 2, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus City Council last week passed a resolution declaring racism a public health crisis. Cuyahoga County and Summit County leaders have considered similar declarations, as demonstrations flare up across the country to protest the deaths of Black Americans at the hands of police.

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