race

Updated at 3:36 p.m. ET Friday

A Census Bureau announcement about the race and ethnicity questions for the 2020 census suggests the Trump administration will not support Obama-era proposals to change how the U.S. government collects information about race and ethnicity, census experts say.

Debbie Holmes

Ten years after the 2008 recession, some small businesses in Central Ohio—especially establishments run by African-Americans—could still use a boost to become  successful. That’s one of the reasons why a new Central Ohio African-American Chamber of Commerce recently opened in northeast Columbus.

Jerry Horton / Cleveland State University

Marion Motley Playfields is a park on Cleveland’s east side. Named for a local pro football star, it has grassy fields, baseball diamonds and hills.

"The federal government must take bold action to address inequitable funding in our nation's public schools."

So begins a list of recommendations released Thursday by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, an independent, bipartisan agency created by Congress in 1957 to investigate civil rights complaints. Thursday's report comes after a lengthy investigation into how America's schools are funded and why so many that serve poor and minority students aren't getting the resources they say they need.

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Despite years of efforts to push down the infant mortality rate of black babies, the latest data shows Ohio has a worse rate than nearly every other state in the nation.

Editor's note: This story contains language that may be offensive.

In February 2009, Samantha Pierce became pregnant with twins. It was a time when things were going really well in her life.

She and her husband had recently gotten married. They had good jobs.

"I was a kick-ass community organizer," says Pierce, who is African-American and lives in Cleveland. She worked for a nonprofit that fought against predatory lending. The organization was growing, and Pierce had been promoted to management.

Chris Newman used to be a software engineering manager, well-paid, but he worked long hours, ate fast food and went to the doctor a lot.

Eventually, enough was enough. He and his wife moved from the Washington, D.C., area to Charlottesville, Va., to become farmers. Now he is healthier, has fewer stomach problems and can eat dairy products again. He raises pigs, ducks and chickens.

On a melancholy Saturday this past February, Shalon Irving's "village" — the friends and family she had assembled to support her as a single mother — gathered at a funeral home in a prosperous black neighborhood in southwest Atlanta to say goodbye.

Updated Dec. 6

"White" has been a constant of the U.S. census.

Other racial categories for the national head count have come and gone over the centuries. But "white" has stuck ever since U.S. marshals went door to door by horseback for the first census in 1790, tallying up the numbers of "free white males" and "free white females," plus "all other free persons" and "slaves."

We've all been hungry in a new place, scrolling indecisively through the results of a 'Google: food near me' search. You know you're not quite in the mood for a burger and fries, but unsure about which Pho restaurant is the best for a first timer.

So this week on Ask Code Switch, we're gonna whip up some wisdom for a reader who's in search of the best food from different cultures.

Here's Laura Epstein, from Magnolia, Del.:

Larry Graham purchased the house at 9904 Anderson Avenue in 2015, according to public records.* But on a recent chilly fall afternoon, he wasn’t there. In fact, the house he’d tried to buy for $13,000 looked as if it had been abandoned months ago.

Frank Ford, a housing policy researcher at the Western Reserve Land Conservancy, stood on the sidewalk, looking up at the two-story, yellow-and-white house, studying the decay.

Sunday worship at Church in the Circle includes a variety of music, members represent multiple races and economic statuses and people attend the University Circle Church from inside and outside of the city. And the spirit of diversity is intentional.

“Enable people to know, ‘hey, I could find something of myself there,” said Rev. Kenneth Chalker, pastor of the church.

Chalker began working in Cleveland 30 years ago at First United Methodist Church at E. 30th Street and Euclid Avenue.

As she cradles three-year old Jackson in her lap, Robin Brown coaxes him to count.

"Say one … two … come on Jackson," says Brown.

But all she gets from her great nephew is a blank stare.

"This look is the look that hurts, when you see a look on a child's face that they want to do something but can't. That hurts," said Brown.

It's time for another Ask Code Switch. This week, we're getting into the gray area between yellow and brown.

Amy Tran, from Minneapolis, asks:

Like many cities, Cleveland has a black part of town and a white part of town.  These divisions didn’t happen by chance.  Ideastream’s new series, Divided By Design, explores the policies that shaped and isolated our neighborhoods.  But there’s another storyline, too, one of black upward mobility that Todd Michney highlights in his new book, Surrogate Suburbs Black Upward Mobility and Neighborhood Change

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