race

Cincinnati Health Department data shows African Americans have the highest confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Dawn at Bicentennial Park in downtown Columbus.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

Franklin County has recorded 1,837 COVID-19 cases and 48 deaths as of Friday. But ZIP code data shows smaller racial disparities in those numbers than in the rest of the state. 

Until a few weeks ago, Melissa St. Hilaire worked the night shift taking care of a 95-year-old woman for a family in Miami.

"I help her to go to the bathroom, use the bathroom, and I watch TV with her, and I comb her hair sometimes in the night," she said.

But one day in March, the woman's daughter told her not to come back, saying she wanted to protect her mother during the coronavirus pandemic.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine isn't requiring Ohioans to wear masks when in public, but says he will wear one and he strongly encourages everyone else do the same. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also recommend wearing a face covering to help stop the spread of the coronavirus.

Taylor Williams, left, and other shoppers what in line to enter a Traders Joes store, Monday, April 6, 2020, in Woodmere Village, Ohio. Only 25 customers are allowed in the store at one time.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

In a newsletter this week, Columbus City Council president Shannon Hardin had a prediction: “Coronavirus may not discriminate, but underlying health and economic disparities mean that the impacts of COVID-19 will hit neighborhoods like the Near East Side and Southfield the hardest.”

Dr. Amy Acton, Ohio Department of Health director
OFFICE OF GOV. MIKE DEWINE

Ohio’s coronavirus tracking website is now showing a breakdown of COVID-19 cases and deaths by race and ethnicity. However the state's health director is cautioning that this information is incomplete.

The new coronavirus doesn't discriminate. But physicians in public health and on the front lines say that in the response to the pandemic, they can already see the emergence of familiar patterns of racial and economic bias.

In one analysis, it appears doctors may be less likely to refer African Americans for testing when they show up for care with signs of infection.

Democratic presidential candidates, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, and former Vice President Joe Biden, right, participate in a Democratic debate on Feb. 25, 2020 in South Carolina.
Patrick Semansky / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the aftermath of the Super Tuesday primary election results. Democratic strategist Derrick Clay joins the show.

Voters cast their ballots at the Cincinnati Public Library's polling station, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, in Cincinnati.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Crime, drugs and guns top the list of social issues most concerning to African Americans in Ohio, according to a statewide poll released Wednesday.

The Trump campaign is opening field offices in swing states targeted directly at attracting black voters, a demographic the president has been aggressively courting in his re-election efforts.

The offices are planned for 15 cities with large African American communities and will be used for campaign events and activities, as well as meet-and-greets with surrogates.

Slavery Reparations

Feb 18, 2020
A large woodcut image of an enslaved man appeared in an 1837 publication of an antislavery poem.
Library of Congress

The debate for reparations for African Americans and the descendants of slaves is one that has persisted since the official end of slavery with the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863.

The University of Cincinnati's Uptown campus is experiencing record growth in student enrollment, particularly among first generation students and people of color.

The Green Book And Black Travel In America

Jan 16, 2020
OpenDurham

Often called the “bible of black travel,” The Green Book wasn’t just a convenient handbook for travelers, but also a lifesaver at a time when travel for black Americans was difficult and dangerous.

India Hardy has lived with pain since she was a toddler — from dull persistent aches to acute flare-ups that interrupt the flow of her normal life.

The pain is from sickle cell disease, a group of genetic conditions that affect about 100,000 people in the U.S., many of them of African or Hispanic descent.

Sitting in the afternoon heat on her mom's porch in Athens, Ga., Hardy remembers how a recent "crisis" derailed her normal morning routine.

A Ride or Die gun trainer instructs a student on how to safely use her gun.
Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

For some, after Donald Trump was elected president, conversations about race became even more intense.

Tensions heightened so much, one 15-year-old African American boy cried and began to question the safety of his Ohio family. Single mother Tiffany Ware reassured her son she would make sure they were safe.

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